As You Like It simplified

Synopsis

The play is set in a mysterious community, in a mysterious land, now led by a duke who has recently wrested control of the community from his brother. The community is located near a unique and mysterious forest, the Forest of Arden. Most of the play takes place in this Forest of Arden, a fantasy forest of sorts where lions attack people while sheep graze nearby, and where fools and exiled men live. But there was a Forest of Arden near Shakespeare’s native Stratford.

Early on we learn that the late Sir Rowland de Boys, a man well respected and a leader in this community, left three sons as his descendents, all young, none married, Oliver, Jaques and Orlando. But Oliver is the oldest and thus the beneficiary of his father’s estate. The custom of the time was known as primogeniture, a custom where the oldest son inherits the whole of his father’s estate. Speaking to Oliver, Orlando (the youngest brother) acknowledges the primogeniture custom, saying “The courtesy of nations allows you my better, in that you are the first-born.” Jaques, Sir Rowland’s second son, is away at school, entering only late in the play as the Second Brother and then only briefly. As the heir to his father’s resources, Oliver abuses his inherited privileges, mistreating Orlando, and Orlando justifiably resents it. Nearly eighty year old Adam is Oliver’s servant, but he has sympathy for Orlando’s plight, is looking for some adventure, figuring he has only so much time left. Shakespeare gave Adam a very nice role, honoring him as he does, giving him some real good lines covering the nature of people.

The de Boys live in this “mysterious community,” a community that has been politically controlled for some time by Duke Senior, but Duke Senior, as we say, was recently overthrown by his younger brother, Duke Frederick. Along with a group of lords and others, Duke Senior has been banished to the Forest of Arden, the fantasy island of its time. The usurped Duke Senior has a beautiful daughter, Rosalind, and she is the play’s lead. Is she ever! The other female lead is Celia, the usurping Duke Frederick’s daughter, therefore Rosalind’s cousin, but also Rosalind’s very good friend and confidant. As background, neither Rosalind nor Celia has brothers or sisters. The exiled Duke Senior and Sir Rowland de Boys were friends; Duke Frederick and Sir Rowland de Boys were enemies.

The play opens with a serious quarrel between the de Boys brothers, Oliver and Orlando. Early on Adam comes to Orlando’s defense when Oliver tells Orlando to “be better employed, and be quiet awhile.” Orlando responds “Shall I keep your hogs and eat husks with them?” Responding to that comment, an angry Oliver grabs Orlando by the throat, at which point Adam enters saying “Sweet masters, be patient. For your father’s remembrance, be at accord.” Oliver dismisses the two of them, saying to Adam “Get you with him, you old dog.” Orlando and Adam exit. At about this time Charles enters, Charles being Duke Frederick’s wrestler. He and Oliver have a small-talk conversation when Charles lets Oliver know that he’s heard that “your younger brother Orlando hath a disposition to come in disguised against me to try a fall.” Oliver responds that “if he do grace himself on thee, I had just as soon thou didst break his neck as his finger.”

Separately Rosalind anguishes over the banishment of her father; her cousin Celia comforting her, suggesting she try falling in love. The two girls hear about the planned wrestling match, Rosalind asking Celia “Shall we see this wrestling, cousin?” Rosalind and Celia meet Orlando at the match, Rosalind asking him “Young man, have you challenged Charles the wrestler?” Orlando responds “I come to try with him the strength of my youth.” Celia responds “Young gentleman, your spirits are too bold for your years.” To the surprise of everyone, Orlando throws Charles who is carried off by attendants, infuriating Duke Frederick. Rosalind and Celia meet with Orlando after the match, Rosalind giving him a chain from her neck, saying “Wear this for me --- out of Fortune’s favor.” They instantly fall for each other, Orlando saying “But heavenly Rosalind!”

Seriously upset with Charles’ loss to Orlando, Duke Frederick arbitrarily dismisses Rosalind from his court, having cared for her as if she were his daughter since her father’s exile, telling her “Mistress, get you from our court.” Rosalind asks “did I offend your Highness?” Duke Frederick responds “let it suffice thee that I trust thee not.” Celia promptly tells her father to “pronounce that sentence then on me, my liege,” at which point an irrational Duke Frederick tells his daughter Celia that “she is banished.” When Celia tells Rosalind of her falling-out with her father, Rosalind asks her “Why, whither shall we go?” Celia answers “To seek my uncle in the Forest of Arden.” For the sake of safety, Rosalind decides that she will disguise herself as a man, she being the taller, saying to Celia “therefore look you call me Ganymede.” She asks Celia “What will you be called?” And Celia says “No longer Celia, but Aliena,” now pretending to be Ganymede’s sister. The girls leave for the Forest of Arden, but not before Celia has convinced Touchstone, Duke Frederick’s court jester, to join them on their adventure trip “to liberty, and not to banishment.”

Meanwhile, Adam advises Orlando that he must immediately leave the community since “your virtues are sanctified and holy traitors to you. Your brother has heard your praises, and this night he means to burn the lodging and you within it. Do not enter it.” Adam persuades Orlando to take him with him, saying “from seventeen years till now almost fourscore have lived I, but now live here no more. At seventeen years, many their fortunes seek, but at fourscore, it is too late a week. I have five hundred crowns, the thrifty hire I saved under your father. Take that, and He that doth the ravens feed, yea, providently caters for the sparrow, be comfort to my age. Here is the gold. All this I give you. Let me be your servant.” Unable to resist that request, Orlando says “We’ll go along together” as they leave for the Forest of Arden.

Having discovered that his daughter is missing and having heard the rumor that she and Rosalind may have left the community, perhaps to follow Orlando, Duke Frederick seeks out Oliver. His plan is to require Oliver to find his brother Orlando. Meanwhile, Rosalind, Celia and Touchstone have left town, and now find themselves on the edge of the Forest of Arden. By happenstance they meet a shepherd, Corin, who tells them that his master’s cottage, pasture and sheep are for sale. Celia buys the property and the chattel. Separately and independently, Orlando and Adam have arrived in this mystical forest, famished and exhausted, particularly the almost eighty year old Adam, who says “O, I die for food. Here lie I down and measure out my grave. Farewell kind master.” As Orlando leaves to find some food for the two of them, he tells Adam to “hold death awhile at the arm’s end. I will here be with thee presently, and if I bring thee not something to eat, I will give thee leave to die.” Meanwhile, Duke Senior and his men are about to sit down to dinner when Jaques, Duke Senior’s want-to-be fool tells the duke that “I met a fool i’ th’ forest, a motley fool. As I do live by food, I met a fool, who spoke in well composed language, and yet a motley fool.” But we don’t know quite who the motley fool was. Interrupting Jaques, Orlando rushes in and says “Forbear, and eat no more,” brandishing a sword, confronting Duke Senior and his entourage, demanding to be fed. To his surprise, he is warmly greeted, Jaques saying “Why, I have eat none yet.” Taken back, Orlando tells them of Adam, saying “till he be first sufficed, oppressed with two weak evils, age and hunger, I will not touch a bit.” Duke Senior responds “go find him out, and we will nothing waste till you return.” Orlando exits. It is here where Jaques shares his most famous soliloquy “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.” Orlando soon returns with Adam, Duke Senior saying “Welcome. Set down your venerable burden, and let him feed.” Orlando thanks him. Adam says “I scarce can speak to thank you for myself.”

We then learn that Orlando has been traipsing through the forest hanging love verses written for Rosalind on the branches of bushes and trees. A mystified Rosalind sees and reads the verses; Touchstone mocks them; Celia knows the writer. Reading the poems, Touchstone says “This is the very false canter of verses. Why do you infect yourself with them?” Rosaline snaps back, “Peace, you dull fool. I found them on a tree.” Touchstone responds “Truly, the tree yields bad fruit.” Celia says “Can you guess who hath done this?” Rosalind asks “Is it a man?” Celia says “And with a chain, that you once wore, about his neck.” And Rosalind asks “I prithee, who? Nay, but who is it?” Celia shouts “O wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful, and yet again wonderful, and after that out of all whooping!” Celia tells her who he is. Rosalind says “How looked he? Did he ask for me? Answer me in one word.” Orlando soon enters. Rosalind, disguised as Ganymede, greets him and brings up the matter of the love verses. Ganymede says to him that “there is a man haunts the forest that abuses our young plants with carving ‘Rosalind’ on their barks, hangs odes upon hawthorns, all, forsooth, deifying the name of Rosalind. If I could meet that fancy-monger, I would give him some good counsel.” Orlando says “I am he that is so love-shaked. I pray you tell me your remedy.” Rosalind as Ganymede says “Love is merely a madness. I profess curing it by counsel.” He says “I would not be cured, youth.” And she says “I would cure you if you would but call me Rosalind and come every day to my cottage and woo me.” He says “I will. Tell me where it is.” She says “Go with me to it, and I’ll show it you.” He says “With all my heart, good youth.” And she says “Nay, you must call me Rosalind.”

Meanwhile, Touchstone has met and fallen for Audrey, a goat-keeper, and they hope to marry. Orlando re-enters and again lets Ganymede know how much he loves Rosalind. Rosalind as Ganymede insists he call her Rosalind as she acts out her plan. Separately the too-meek Silvius, the apprentice to the shepherd Corin, has fallen for Phoebe, a shepherdess. But Phoebe treats him poorly, saying such things like “Now I do frown on thee with all my heart, and if mine eyes can wound, now let them kill thee.” Rosalind, overhearing Phoebe berate Silvius, enters the conversation as Ganymede and sternly lets Phoebe know that she should “thank heaven for a good man’s love” and that “you should sell when you can; you are not for all markets.” Accepting the harsh criticism, Phoebe instantly falls for Ganymede, appreciating his (her) strength and boldness. Ganymede tells her “I pray you, do not fall in love with me, for I am falser than vows made in wine.” Nonetheless, Phoebe tells Silvius she’ll write to Ganymede letting him know her feelings for him and that “thou shalt bear it.” And he does.

Meanwhile, Rosalind holds another counseling session with Orlando. He exits, promising to return by two o’clock that afternoon. Rosalind confides in Celia that she is head-over-heels in love with Orlando, telling her “O coz, coz, coz, thou doth know how many fathom deep I am in love.” But Orlando is late for his pre-determined, time-certain date with Rosalind, and she is crushed. Celia doesn’t help her much. Meanwhile Silvius enters with the letter from Phoebe to Ganymede, letting him (really, her) know of her love for him. She tells him “go your way to her, for I see love hath made thee a tame snake.” As Silvius exits, Oliver enters, having been absent from the play for three acts, telling the two of them that he is on a mission from Orlando, asking the girls if they know about the “cottage fenced about with olive trees” and if they know of “that youth he calls his Rosalind.” Rosalind quickly says “I am. What must we understand by this?” Oliver then proceeds to tell them how he was threatened by a lioness and that Orlando saved him from certain death, but that Orlando was seriously injured in the doing, the reason his brother missed the two o’clock meeting. Rosalind as Ganymede faints, overwhelmed as she is by the story. When she recovers, she embarrassingly claims that the fainting was just an act. Oliver tells her “you lack a man’s heart.” She says “I do. I confess it.” As Oliver exits, Rosalind as Ganymede asks him “to commend my counterfeiting to your brother.”

As might be expected, Oliver has fallen for Celia as Aliena, having kept his eye on her as he was telling the two young women of the story of his seriously injured brother. When he returns to Orlando, Oliver tells him that “I love Aliena” and asks his brother to consent to their marriage and that “my father’s house and all the revenue that was old Sir Rowland’s will I estate upon you, and here live and die a shepherd.” Events then move even more quickly. With his arm in a sling, Orlando agrees that Oliver and Aliena may be married the next day, their father being deceased and Jaques being away at school. With all the confidence in the world, Rosalind as Ganymede later tells Orlando to “put in your best array; for if you will be married tomorrow, you shall, and to Rosalind, if you will.” She (as a he) proceeds to tell Phoebe he’ll marry her “if ever I marry a woman,” but firmly suggests to her that she turn her attention to Silvius. Skillful Rosalind as Ganymede causes all four parties to be prepared to be married the next day, drawing in her father, he still unaware that Ganymede is his daughter. Rosalind is at her very best here. As Ganymede, she asks her father, who as we say still doesn’t recognize her, that “if I bring in your Rosalind, you will bestow her on Orlando here?” He responds “That would I, had I kingdoms to give with her.” The next day Rosalind and Celia, no longer masquerading, enter the forest as they really are. Duke Senior rejoices in being with his daughter and his niece. Orlando cries “You are my Rosalind.” All four couples are married, the men being Oliver, Orlando, Silvius and Touchstone. The Second Brother, Jaques, had entered earlier to say that Duke Frederick had returned the crown to his older brother, Duke Senior. At the end, Duke Senior says “all will share in the good of our returned fortune.” This is one more beautiful happy-ending Shakespeare love-comedy.

Principal Characters

Adam. Adam is the nearly eighty year old servant to Oliver, having served as servant to the de Boys boys’ father before his death. Adam is active early in the play, loyal to Oliver, but sympathetic to Orlando’s lack of leverage; Orlando receiving none of his father’s inheritance. Adam joins Orlando on his adventure into the Forest of Arden, but doesn’t survive the trip. Shakespeare draws him as one of the really fine guys.

Celia. Celia is Duke Frederick’s only child and is Rosalind’s cousin. Celia offers to share her inheritance with Rosalind, Rosalind left with little once her father, Duke Senior, was usurped by his younger brother, Duke Frederick. Through most of the play, Celia masquerades as Aliena, Ganymede’s sister, Ganymede being Rosalind in disguise. Celia does not have a big role. It is Rosalind’s play, but Celia is a wonderfully loyal companion to Rosalind throughout.

Duke Frederick. As the play begins Duke Frederick has somehow taken the crown away from his older brother, Duke Senior, and exiled his brother and his brother’s entourage to the Forest of Arden. For perhaps several reasons, he expels Rosalind from his court, after caring for her after he had banished her father. Duke Frederick does not have a big role.

Duke Senior. Duke Senior does not have much of a role either. His principal role is as Rosalind’s father. He treats everyone wonderfully. He spends all his time in this play in the Forest of Arden, homeless, but happy and generous.

Oliver. Oliver is Sir Rowland de Boys oldest son who inherited his father’s estate. Early on, he treats his youngest brother, Orlando, very poorly, even trying to have him beaten up by Duke Frederick’s wrestler. Orlando later saves Oliver’s life by protecting him from a lioness, causing Oliver (for perhaps other reasons as well) to become a very supporting older brother.

Orlando. Orlando is the youngest son of the late Sir Rowland de Boys; mistreated early in the play by his older brother, Oliver. Orlando, fearing for his life, heads for the Forest of Arden. Almost eighty year old Adam, Oliver’s servant, joins Orlando on their adventure into the Forest of Arden where the rest of the action plays out. Orlando falls for Rosalind, and she for him, which is the play’s central theme.

Rosalind. Rosalind is Duke Senior’s daughter who teams up with her cousin Celia, Duke Frederick’s daughter, to lead the play’s parade. She has a huge role and is fabulous. During much of the play she masquerades as Ganymede, pretending to be Celia’s brother, Celia masquerading as Aliena. She is quite the magician as well as quite the match-maker. She is even better as a pre-marriage counselor. Shakespeare created Rosalind with a charm unlike, in our view, any other person in any of his other plays.

The Play


  • Act 1, Scene 1
  • The play opens with Orlando complaining to Adam about his poor state of affairs.
  •  
  •  
  • Orlando to Adam
  •  
  • My father bequeathed me by will but a
  • Poor one thousand crowns, Adam, but my way
  • To fortune was his charge to my brother
  • To breed me well; there begins my sadness.
  • He keeps Jaques at school where teachers confer
  • Him fine marks, I hear. For my part, I’m less
  • Well kept at home, that differs not much from
  • The stalling of an ox. Riders hired come
  • From afar to his well bred horses, where
  • I gain nothing but growth, yet am bound to
  • Him as are his horses. It is unfair
  • And grieves me that I know not what to do.
  • Servitude makes me want to mutiny
  • Against it, yet I know no remedy.
  • Oliver enters.
  • ORLANDO TO ADAM
  • Go apart, Adam, and thou shalt hear how he will shake me up.
  • Adam steps aside.
  • OLIVER
  • Now, sir, what make you here?
  • ORLANDO
  • Nothing, I am not taught to make anything. I am helping you to make that which God made, a poor unworthy brother of yours, with idleness.
  • OLIVER
  • Marry, sir, be better employed.
  • ORLANDO
  • Shall I keep your hogs and eat husks with them?
  • OLIVER
  • Know you where you are, sir? Know you before whom, sir?
  • ORLANDO
  • The courtesy of nations allows you my better, in that you are the first-born. I have as much of my father in me as you, albeit I confess your coming before me is nearer to his reverence.
  • Oliver threatens Orlando. Orlando grabs Oliver by the throat.
  • OLIVER
  • Wilt thou lay hands on me, villain?
  • ORLANDO
  • I am no villain. I am the youngest son of Sir Rowland de Boys. Wert thou not my brother, I would not take this hand from thy throat till this other had pulled out thy tongue.
  • Adam comes forward.
  • ADAM
  • Sweet masters, be patient.
  • OLIVER TO ORLANDO
  • Let me go, I say.
  • ORLANDO
  • I will not till I please. My father charged you in his will to give me good education. You have trained me like a peasant. The spirit of my father grows strong in me, and I will no longer endure it.
  • Orlando releases Oliver.
  • OLIVER
  • And what wilt thou do? I will not long be troubled with you.
  • ORLANDO
  • I will no further offend you than becomes me for my good.
  • OLIVER TO ADAM
  • Get you with him, you old dog.
  • ADAM
  • Is “old dog” my reward? God be with my old master. He would not have spoke such a word.
  • Orlando and Adam exit. Dennis enters. Dennis is another servant to Oliver.
  • OLIVER
  • Was not Charles, the Duke’s wrestler, here to speak with me?
  • DENNIS
  • So please you.
  • OLIVER
  • Call him in.
  • Charles enters. The duke is Duke Frederick.
  • OLIVER
  • What’s the new news at the new court?
  • CHARLES
  • There’s no news at the court, sir, but the old news. That is, the old duke is banished by his younger brother the new duke, and three or four lords have put themselves into voluntary exile with him.
  • OLIVER
  • Can you tell if Rosalind, the Duke’s daughter, be banished with her father?
  • CHARLES
  • O no. She is at the court and no less beloved of her uncle than his own daughter.
  • OLIVER
  • Where will the old duke live?
  • CHARLES
  • They say he is already in the Forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say many young gentlemen flock to him every day and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
  • OLIVER
  • What, you wrestle tomorrow before the new duke?
  • CHARLES
  • Marry, so I, sir. I am given, sir, secretly to understand that your younger brother Orlando hath a disposition to come in disguised against me to try a fall.
  • OLIVER
  • Charles, I thank thee for thy love to me, which thou shalt find I will most kindly requite. I had just as soon thou didst break his neck as his finger. If he do not mightily grace himself on thee, he will practice against thee by poison. I assure thee, there is not one so young and so villainous this day living.
  • CHARLES
  • I am heartily glad I came hither to you. If he come tomorrow, I’ll give him his payment.
  • Charles exits.
  • OLIVER
  • I hope I shall see an end of him, for my soul---yet I know not why---hates nothing more than he. But it shall not be so long; this wrestler shall clear all.
  • He exits.
  • Act 1, Scene 2
  • Cousins Rosalind and Celia enter.
  • CELIA
  • I pray thee, Rosalind, sweet my coz, be merry.
  • ROSALIND
  • Dear Celia, I show more mirth than I am mistress of.
  • CELIA
  • If my uncle, thy banished father, had banished thy uncle, the Duke my father, so thou hadst been still with me.
  • ROSALIND
  • Well, I will forget the condition of my estate to rejoice in yours.
  • CELIA
  • You know my father hath no child but I, and truly, when he dies, thou shalt be his heir, for what he hath taken away from thy father forcibly, I will render thee again in affection. Therefore, my sweet Rose, be merry.
  • ROSALIND
  • From henceforth I will, coz, and devise sports. Let me see----what think you of falling in love?
  • CELIA
  • Marry, I prithee do, to make sport withal; but love no man in good earnest.
  • ROSALIND
  • What shall be our sport, then?
  • CELIA
  • Let us sit and mock the good housewife Fortune from her wheel, that her gifts may henceforth be bestowed equally.
  • ROSALIND
  • I would we could do so, for her benefits are mightily misplaced, and the bountiful blind woman doth most mistake in her gifts to women.
  • CELIA
  • ‘Tis true, for those that she makes fair she scarce makes honest, and those that she makes honest she makes very ill-favoredly.
  • Touchstone enters.
  • CELIA
  • Though Nature hath given us wit to flout at Fortune, hath not Fortune sent in this fool to cut off the argument?
  • CELIA TO TOUCHSTONE
  • How now, wit, whither wander you?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Mistress, you must come away to your father.
  • CELIA
  • Were you made the messenger?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • No, by mine honor, but I was bid to come for you.
  • CELIA
  • Prithee, who is ‘t that thou mean’st?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • One that old Frederick, your father, loves.
  • CELIA
  • My father’s love is enough to honor him. Speak no more of him.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • The more pity that fools may not speak wisely what wise men do foolishly.
  • CELIA
  • By my troth, thou sayest true. For, since the little wit that fools have was silenced, the little foolery that wise men have makes a great show.
  • Le Beau enters.
  • CELIA
  • Monsieur Le Beau. What’s the news?
  • LE BEAU
  • Fair princess, you have lost much good sport.
  • CELIA
  • Sport? Of what color?
  • LE BEAU
  • You amaze me, ladies. I would have told you of good wrestling.
  • ROSALIND
  • Yet tell us the manner of the wrestling.
  • LE BEAU
  • I will tell you the beginning, and if it please your Ladyships, you may see the end, for the best is yet to do, and here, where you are, they are coming to perform it. There comes an old man and his three sons. The eldest of the three wrestled with Charles, the duke’s wrestler, which Charles in a moment threw him and broke three of his ribs, that there is little hope of life in him.
  • ROSALIND
  • Alas!
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • It is the first time that ever I heard breaking of ribs was sport for ladies.
  • CELIA
  • Or I, I promise thee.
  • ROSALIND
  • Shall we see this wrestling, cousin?
  • LE BEAU
  • You must if you stay here.
  • Duke Frederick, Orlando, Charles and others enter.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • How now, daughter and cousin? Are you crept hither to see the wrestling?
  • ROSALIND
  • Ay, my liege, so please you give us leave.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • In pity of the challenger’s youth, I would gladly dissuade him, but he will not be entreated. Speak to him, ladies; see if you can move him.
  • Duke Frederick steps aside.
  • LE BEAU TO ORLANDO
  • Monsieur the challenger, the Princess calls for you.
  • ORLANDO
  • I attend them with all respect and duty.
  • ROSALIND
  • Young man, have you challenged Charles the wrestler?
  • ORLANDO
  • No, fair princess. I come but in as others do, to try with him the strength of my youth.
  • CELIA
  • Young gentleman, your spirits are too bold for your years. We pray you for your own sake to embrace your own safety and give over this attempt.
  • ROSALIND
  • Do, young sir. Your reputation shall not therefore be misprized.
  • ORLANDO
  • I beseech you, punish me not with your hard thoughts, wherein I confess me much guilty to deny so fair and excellent ladies anything. But let your fair eyes and gentle wishes go with me to my trial. If killed, but one dead that is willing to be so. I shall do my friends no wrong, for I have none to lament me; the world no injury, for in it I have nothing.
  • ROSALIND
  • The little strength that I have, I would it were with you.
  • CELIA
  • And mine, to eke out hers.
  • CHARLES
  • Come, where is this young gallant that is so desirous to lie with his mother earth?
  • ORLANDO
  • You mean to mock me after, you should not have mocked me before.
  • CELIA
  • I would I were invisible, to catch the strong fellow by the leg.
  • Orlando and Charles wrestle.
  • ROSALIND
  • O excellent young man!
  • Orlando throws Charles.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • No more, no more.
  • ORLANDO
  • Yes, I beseech your Grace. I am not yet well breathed.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • How dost thou, Charles?
  • LE BEAU
  • He cannot speak, my lord.
  • Charles is carried off by attendants.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • What is thy name, young man?
  • ORLANDO
  • Orlando, my liege, the youngest son of Sir Rowland de Boys.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • The world esteemed thy father honorable, but I did find him still mine enemy. I would thou hadst told me of another father.
  • Duke, Touchstone, Le Beau and others exit.
  • ORLANDO
  • I am more proud to be Sir Rowland’s son.
  • ROSALIND TO CELIA
  • My father loved Sir Rowland as his soul.
  • CELIA
  • Gentle cousin, let us go thank him and encourage him. My father’s rough and envious disposition sticks me at heart.
  • Rosalind gives Orlando a chain from her neck.
  • ROSALIND
  • Gentleman, wear this for me.
  • ORLANDO ASIDE
  • Can I not say “I thank you?”
  • Rosalind and Celia exit.
  • ORLANDO
  • What passion hangs these weights upon my tongue? I cannot speak to her, yet she urged conference. O poor Orlando! Thou art overthrown.
  • Le Beau enters.
  • ORLANDO
  • I pray you tell me this: which of the two was daughter of the duke that here was at the wrestling?
  •  
  •  
  • Le Beau to Orlando
  •  
  • If we to judge by his manners, neither;
  • Yet indeed the smaller is his daughter.
  • The other woman is daughter to thee
  • Banished duke, detained by her usurping
  • Uncle to keep his daughter company.
  • The duke of late ‘gainst this gentle being
  • Hath ta’en displeasure, grounded solely
  • On no other argument but that the
  • People pity her for her good father’s
  • Sake and praise her for her virtues. I owe
  • You in friendship to counsel that it serves
  • Your interest to leave this place, for although
  • You deserve true applause for this match won,
  • The duke misconstrues all that you have done.
  • ORLANDO
  • I rest much beholden to you. Fare you well.
  • Le Beau exits.
  • ORLANDO
  • But heavenly Rosalind!
  • He exits.
  • Act 1, Scene 3
  • Celia and Rosalind are on stage.
  • CELIA
  • Why, cousin! Why, Rosalind! Cupid have mercy, not a word?
  • ROSALIND
  • Not one to throw at a dog.
  • CELIA
  • Come, lame me with reasons. But is all this for your father?
  • ROSALIND
  • No! O, how full of briers is this working-day world!
  • CELIA
  • They are but burs, cousin, thrown upon thee in holiday foolery.
  • ROSALIND
  • I could shake them off my coat. These burs are in my heart.
  • CELIA
  • Let us talk in good earnest. Is it possible on such a sudden you should fall into so strong a liking with old Sir Rowland’s youngest son?
  • ROSALIND
  • The duke my father loved his father dearly.
  • CELIA
  • By this kind of chase I should hate him, for my father hated his father dearly. Yet I hate not Orlando.
  • Duke Frederick with lords enter.
  • DUKE FREDERICK TO ROSALIND
  • Mistress, dispatch you with your safest haste, and get you from our court.
  • ROSALIND
  • Me, uncle?
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • You, cousin. Within these ten days if that thou beest found so near our public court as twenty miles, thou diest for it.
  • ROSALIND
  • I do beseech your Grace, let me the knowledge of my fault bear with me. Did I offend your Highness?
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • Thus do all traitors. Let it suffice thee that I trust thee not.
  • ROSALIND
  • Tell me whereon the likelihood depends.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • Thou art thy father’s daughter. There’s enough.
  • ROSALIND
  • Treason is not inherited, my lord. My father was no traitor.
  • CELIA
  • Dear sovereign, hear me speak.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • Ay, Celia, we stayed her for your sake.
  • CELIA
  • I did not then entreat to have her stay. It was your pleasure and your own remorse. I was too young that time to value her, but now I know her.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • She is too subtle for thee, and her smoothness, her very silence, and her patience speak to the people, and they pity her. She is banished.
  • CELIA
  • Pronounce that sentence then on me, my liege.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • You are a fool. You, niece, provide yourself. If you outstay the time, upon mine honor and in the greatness of my word, you die.
  • Duke and lords exit.
  • CELIA
  • O my poor Rosalind, whither wilt thou go? I charge thee, be not thou more grieved than I am.
  • ROSALIND
  • I have more cause.
  • CELIA
  • Thou hast not, cousin. Know’st thou not the Duke hath banished me, his daughter?
  • ROSALIND
  • That he hath not.
  • CELIA
  • No, hath not? Rosalind lacks then the love which teacheth thee that thou and I am one. Shall we part? No, let my father seek another heir. I’ll go along with thee.
  • ROSALIND
  • Why, whither shall we go?
  • CELIA
  • To seek my uncle in the Forest of Arden.
  • ROSALIND
  • Alas, what danger will it be to us. Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold.
  • CELIA
  • I’ll put myself in poor and mean attire. The like do you.
  • ROSALIND
  • Were it not better, because that I am more than common tall, that I did suit me all points like a man?
  • CELIA
  • What shall I call thee when thou art a man?
  • ROSALIND
  • Look you call me Ganymede. But what will you be called?
  • CELIA
  • No longer Celia, but Aliena.
  • ROSALIND
  • But, cousin, what if we assayed to steal the clownish fool out of your father’s court? Would he not be a comfort to our travel?
  • CELIA
  • He’ll go along o’er the wide world with me. Leave me alone to woo him. Now go we in content to liberty, and not to banishment.
  • They exit.
  • Act 2, Scene 1
  • Duke Senior, Amiens and other courtiers of the duke are in the Forest of Arden.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, hath not old custom made this life more sweet than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods more free from peril than the envious court? Sweet are the uses of adversity, which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, wears yet a precious jewel in his head. And this our life, exempt from public hunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.
  • AMIENS
  • I would not change it. Happy is your Grace, that can translate the stubbornness of fortune into so quiet and so sweet a style.
  • They exit.
  • Act 2, Scene 2
  • Duke Frederick and some of his lords are on stage, having discovered that Celia is missing.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • Can it be possible that no man saw them?
  • FIRST LORD
  • I cannot hear of any that did see her. The ladies her attendants of her chamber saw her abed, and in the morning early they found the bed untreasured of their mistress.
  • SECOND LORD
  • My lord, the scurvy clown at whom so oft your Grace was wont to laugh is also missing. Hisperia, the Princess’ gentlewoman, confesses that she secretly o’erheard your daughter and her cousin much commend the parts and graces of the wrestler that did but lately foil the sinewy Charles.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • Send for his brother. Fetch that gallant hither. If he be absent, bring his brother to me. I’ll make him find him.
  • They exit.
  • Act 2, Scene 3
  • Orlando is on stage. Adam enters.
  • ORLANDO
  • Who’s there?
  • ADAM
  • O my gentle master, O you memory of old Sir Rowland! Why are you virtuous? Wherefore are you gentle, strong, and valiant? Know you not, master, to some kind of men their graces serve them but as enemies? No more do yours. Your virtues, gentle master, are sanctified and holy traitors to you.
  • ORLANDO
  • Why, what’s the matter?
  • ADAM
  • Come not within these doors. Within this roof the enemy of all your graces lives. Your brother hath heard your praises, and this night he means to burn the lodging where you use to lie, and you within it. Do not enter it.
  • ORLANDO
  • Whither, Adam, wouldst thou have me go?
  • ADAM
  • No matter whither, so you come not here.
  • ORLANDO
  • What, wouldst thou have me go and beg my food, or with a base and boist’rous sword enforce a thievish living on the common road? This I will not do. I rather will subject me to the malice of a diverted blood and bloody brother.
  • ADAM
  • But do not so.
  •  
  •  
  • Adam to Orlando
  •  
  • I have five hundred crowns saved under your
  • Father, which, to be my nurse, I did store
  • For service called should my old limbs lie lame,
  • And disregarded age in corners thrown.
  • Knowing He providently serves the same
  • To ravens and sparrows comforts His own,
  • Here is the gold. All this I give you. Let
  • Me be your servant. Though I look old, yet
  • I am strong and healthy, for in my youth
  • I ne’er did apply rebellious liquor
  • In my blood, behave with shame; and in sooth
  • Wooed not the lusty maids seen the weaker.
  • Master, go on, and I will follow thee
  • To the last gasp with truth and loyalty.
  • ADAM
  • Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, frosty but kindly. Let me go with you.
  • ORLANDO
  • O good old man, how well in thee appears the constant service of the antique world, when service sweat for duty, not for need, thou art not for the fashion of these times, where none will sweat but for promotion, and having that do choke their service up even with the having. We’ll go along together.
  • ADAM
  • Master, go on, and I will follow thee to the last gasp with truth and loyalty. From seventeen years till now almost fourscore here lived I, but now live here no more. At seventeen years, many their fortunes seek, but at fourscore, it is too late a time. Yet fortune cannot recompense me better than to die well, and not my master’s debtor.
  • They exit.
  • Act 2, Scene 4
  • Rosalind as Ganymede, Celia as Aliena, and Touchstone as the clown enter.
  • ROSALIND
  • O Jupiter, how weary are my spirits!
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • I care not for my spirits, if my legs were not weary.
  • ROSALIND
  • I could find in my heart to disgrace my man’s apparel and to cry like a woman.
  • CELIA
  • I pray you bear with me. I cannot go further.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • For my part, I had rather bear with you than bear you.
  • ROSALIND
  • Well, this is the Forest of Arden.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Ay, now am I in Arden, the more fool I. When I was at home I was in a better place, but travelers must be content.
  • Corin and Silvius enter. Rosalind, Celia and Touchstone step aside and eavesdrop.
  • SILVIUS
  • O Corin, that thou knew’st how I do love her!
  • CORIN
  • I partly guess, for I have loved ere now.
  • SILVIUS
  • No, Corin, being old, thou canst not guess, though in thy youth thou wast as true a lover as ever sighed upon a midnight pillow. How many actions most ridiculous hast thou been drawn to by thy fantasy.
  • CORIN
  • Into a thousand that I have forgotten.
  • SILVIUS
  • If thou rememb’rest not the slightest folly that ever love did make thee run into, thou hast not loved. O Phoebe, Phoebe.
  • He exits.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • We that are true lovers run into strange capers. But as all is mortal in nature, so is all nature in love mortal in folly.
  • ROSALIND
  • Thou speak’st wiser than thou art ware of.
  • TOUCHSTONE TO CORIN
  • Holla, you clown!
  • CORIN
  • Who calls?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Your betters, sir.
  • ROSALIND TO TOUCHSTONE
  • Peace, I say.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO CORIN
  • Good even to you, friend.
  • CORIN
  • And to you, gentle sir, and to you all.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I Prithee, shepherd, bring us where we may rest ourselves and feed. Here’s a young maid with travel much oppressed. And faints for succor.
  • CORIN
  • Fair sir, I pity her. But I am shepherd to another man and do not shear the fleeces that I graze. My master’s cote, his flocks, and bounds of feed are now on sale.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • What is he that shall buy his flock and pasture?
  • CORIN
  • That young swain that you saw here but erewhile, that little cares for buying anything.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I pray thee, buy thou the cottage, pasture, and the flock, and thou shalt have to pay for it of us.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • And we will mend thy wages. I like this place, and willingly could waste my time in it.
  • CORIN
  • If you like upon report the soil, the profit, and this kind of life, I will your very faithful feeder be and buy it with your gold right suddenly.
  • They exit.
  • Act 2, Scene 5
  • Amiens, Jacques, and other lords attending Duke Senior enter.
  • AMIENS SINGS
  • Under the greenwood tree who loves to lie with me.
  • JAQUES
  • More, more, I Prithee, more.
  • AMIENS
  • I will make you melancholy, Monsieur Jaques.
  • JAQUES
  • More, I Prithee, more. I can suck melancholy out of a song as a weasel sucks eggs.
  • AMIENS
  • Well, I’ll end the song. Sirs, the Duke will drink under this tree. He hath been all this day to search for you.
  • JAQUES
  • And I have been all this day to avoid him. He is too disputable for my company. I think of as many matters as he, but I give heaven thanks and make no boast of them.
  • AMIENS
  • And I’ll go seek the Duke. His banquet is prepared.
  • They exit.
  • Act 2, Scene 6
  • Orlando and Adam enter.
  • ADAM
  • O, I die for food. Here lie I down and measure out my grave. Farewell, kind master.
  • He lies down.
  • ORLANDO
  • Why Adam? No greater heart in thee? If this uncouth forest yield anything savage, I will either be food for it or bring it for food to thee. Hold death awhile at the arms’ end. I will here be with thee presently, and if I bring thee not something to eat, I will give thee leave to die. But if thou diest before I come, thou art a mocker of my labor.
  • He exits.
  • Act 2, Scene 7
  • Duke Senior and his lords sit down for dinner. Jaques enters.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Why monsieur? You look merrily.
  •  
  •  
  • Jaques to Duke Senior
  •  
  • I met a motley fool i’ th’ forest,
  • A fool, as I do live by food and rest,
  • A fool, who railed on to Lady Fortune
  • In good terms. “Good morrow, fool” quoth I. “No
  • Sir,” quoth he, “Call me not ‘fool’ till heaven
  • Hath sent me fortune.” Would you not then know
  • He drew a dial from his pouch and says, “See
  • How the world works. ‘Tis now ten, and to be
  • Eleven after one hour. So from hour
  • To hour we ripe and from hour to hour we
  • Rot, and thereby hangs a tale.” And he, our
  • Fool, says, “They have a gift if ladies be
  • Fair.” He hath strong observations from school
  • Vented in mangled form. Were I a fool!
  • JAQUES
  • O, that I were a fool! I am ambitious for a motley coat.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Thou shalt have one.
  • JAQUES
  • It is my only suit, provided that you weed your better judgments of all opinion that grows rank in them that I am wise. I must have liberty withal, as large a charter as the wind, to blow on whom I please, for so fools have.
  • Orlando enters brandishing a sword.
  • ORLANDO
  • Forbear, and eat no more.
  • JAQUES
  • Why, I have eat none yet.
  • DUKE SENIOR TO ORLANDO
  • Art thou thus boldened, man, by thy distress, or else a rude despiser of good manners, that in civility thou seem’st so empty?
  • ORLANDO
  • But forbear, I say. He dies that touches any of this fruit till I and my affairs are answered.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • What would you have? Your gentleness shall force more than your force move us to gentleness.
  • ORLANDO
  • I almost die for food, and let me have it.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Sit down and feed, and welcome to our table.
  • ORLANDO
  • Speak you so gently? Pardon me, I pray you. I thought that all things had been savage here. If ever you have looked on better days, if ever been where bells have knolled to church, if ever sat at any good man’s feast, if ever from your eyelids wiped a tear and know what ‘tis to pity and be pitied, let gentleness my strong enforcement be, in the which hope I blush and hide my sword.
  • He sheathes his sword.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • True is it that we have seen better days; therefore sit you down in gentleness, and take upon command what help we have that to your wanting may be ministered.
  • ORLANDO
  • There is an old poor man who after me hath many a weary step limped in pure love. Till he be first sufficed, oppressed with two weak evils, age and hunger, I will not touch a bit.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Go find him out, and we will nothing waste till you return.
  • ORLANDO
  • I thank you.
  • He exits.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Thou seest we are not all alone unhappy. This wide and universal theater presents more woeful pageants than the scene wherein we play in.
  •  
  •  
  • Jaques to the dinner party
  •  
  • All the world’s a stage, and all good women
  • And men merely players, having times when
  • They enter and exit, playing many
  • Parts. At first the infant in the arms of
  • A nurse; then as a youth unwillingly
  • Creeping to school; then sighing deep in love
  • Like a furnace. Then a soldier, sudden
  • And quick in quarrel. Full of wise saws then,
  • Playing the part. The sixth age shifts into
  • Spectacles on a nose with a manly
  • Voice turned to one of a youth. Last scene you
  • See that ends this eventful history
  • In a new time of childishness to waste;
  • Oblivious, sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste.
  • Orlando enters carrying Adam
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Welcome. Set down your venerable burden, and let him feed.
  • ORLANDO
  • I thank you most for him.
  • ADAM
  • I scarce can speak to thank you for myself.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Welcome. Give us some music, and, good cousin, sing.
  • The Duke and Orlando continue their conversation.
  • AMIENS SINGS
  • Blow, blow, thou winter wind. Thou art not so unkind as man’s ingratitude. Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky, that dost not bite so nigh as benefits forgot. Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly. Then heigh-ho, the holly. This life is most jolly.
  • DUKE SENIOR TO ORLANDO
  • If that you were the good Sir Rowland’s son, as you have whispered faithfully you were, be truly welcome hither. I am the duke that loved your father. Good old man, thou art right welcome as thy master is.
  • DUKE SENIOR TO HIS LORDS
  • Support him by the arm.
  • They exit.
  • Act 3, Scene 1
  • Duke Frederick and Oliver are on stage.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • Not see him since? Find out thy brother wheresoe’er he is. Seek him with candle. Bring him, dead or living, within this twelve month, or turn thou no more to seek a living in our territory.
  • OLIVER
  • I never loved my brother in his life.
  • DUKE FREDERICK
  • More villain thou.
  • They exit.
  • Act 3, Scene 2
  • Orlando is on stage, hanging love poems to Rosalind on the trees in the forest.
  • ORLANDO
  • Hang there, my verse, in witness of my love. Carve on every tree the fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she.
  • He exits. Corin and Touchstone enter.
  • CORIN
  • And how like you this shepherd’s life, Master Touchstone?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Truly, shepherd, in respect that it is solitary, I like it very well; but in respect that it is private, it is a very vile life.
  • CORIN
  • No more but that I know that he that wants money, means, and content is without three good friends.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Such a one is a natural philosopher.
  • CORIN
  • Sir, I am a true laborer. I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man’s happiness, glad of other men’s good, and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze.
  • Rosalind as Ganymede enter.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE READS A PAPER
  • “From the east to western Ind no jewel is like Rosalind. Let no face be kept in mind but the fair of Rosalind.”
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • “If the cat will after kind, so be sure will Rosalind. Wintered garments must be line, so must slender Rosalind.”
  • TOUCHSTONE TO ROSALIND
  • This is the very false gallop of verses. Why do you infect yourself with them?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Peace, you dull fool. I found them on a tree.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Truly, the tree yields bad fruit.
  • Celia as Aliena enters with a writing.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • Some of violated vows ‘twixt the souls of friend and friend. But upon the fairest boughs, or at every sentence end, will I “Rosalinda” write.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • O most gentle Jupiter.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • Shepherd, go off a little. Go with him, sirrah.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Come, shepherd, let us make an honorable retreat, though not with bag and baggage, yet with scrip and scrippage.
  • Touchstone and Corin exit.
  • CELIA
  • Didst thou hear these verses?
  • ROSALIND
  • O yes, I heard them all.
  • CELIA
  • Didst thou hear without wondering how thy name should be hanged and carved upon these trees? Can you guess who hath done this?
  • ROSALIND
  • Is it a man?
  • CELIA
  • And a chain, that you once wore, about his neck.
  • ROSALIND
  • Nay, I prithee now, with most petitionary vehemence, tell me who it is.
  • CELIA
  • O wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful, and yet again wonderful, and after that out of all whooping!
  • ROSALIND
  • I prithee, tell me who is it quickly, and speak apace.
  • CELIA
  • It is young Orlando, that tripped up the wrestler’s heels and your heart both in an instant.
  • ROSALIND
  • Nay, but the devil take mocking.
  • CELIA
  • I’ faith, coz, ‘tis he.
  • ROSALIND
  • Orlando?
  • CELIA
  • Orlando.
  • ROSALIND
  • What did he when thou saw’st him? How looked he? How parted he with thee? Answer me in one word.
  • CELIA
  • ‘Tis a word too great for any mouth of this age’s size.
  • ROSALIND
  • But doth he know that I am in this forest and in man’s apparel? Looks he as freshly as he did the day he wrestled?
  • CELIA
  • It is as easy to count dusk particles in sunlight as to resolve the propositions of a lover. I found him under a tree like a dropped acorn.
  • ROSALIND
  • Proceed. Do you not know I am a woman? When I think, I must speak.
  • Orlando and Jaques enter. Rosalind and Celia step aside.
  • JAQUES TO ORLANDO
  • I thank you for your company, but, good faith, I had as lief have been myself alone. Let’s meet as little as we can.
  • ORLANDO
  • I do desire we may be better strangers.
  • JAQUES
  • I pray you mar no more trees with writing love songs in their barks.
  • ORLANDO
  • I pray you mar no more of my verses with reading them ill-favoredly.
  • JAQUES
  • Rosalind is your love’s name?
  • ORLANDO
  • Yes, just.
  • JAQUES
  • I do not like her name
  • ORLANDO
  • There was no thought of pleasing you when she was christened.
  • JAQUES
  • You have a nimble wit. Will you sit down with me? And we two will rail against our mistress the world and all our misery.
  • ORLANDO
  • I will chide no breather in the world but myself, against whom I know most faults.
  • JAQUES
  • The worst fault you have is to be in love. I was seeking for a fool when I found you.
  • ORLANDO
  • He is drowned in the brook. Look but in, and you shall see him.
  • JAQUES
  • I’ll tarry no longer with you.
  • ORLANDO
  • I am glad of your departure. Adieu, good Monsieur Melancholy.
  • Jaques exits.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I pray you, what is ‘t o’clock?
  • ORLANDO
  • There’s no clock in the forest.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Then there is no true lover in the forest; else sighing every minute and groaning every hour would detect the lazy foot of time as well as a clock.
  • ORLANDO
  • And why not the swift foot of time?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • By no means, sir. Time travels in diverse paces with diverse persons. Marry, he trots hard with a young maid between the contract of her marriage and the day it is solemnized.
  • ORLANDO
  • Where dwell you, pretty youth?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • With this shepherdess, my sister, here in the skirts of the forest.
  • ORLANDO
  • Your accent is something finer than you could purchase in so removed a dwelling.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Indeed an old religious uncle of mine taught me to speak, who was in his youth an inland man, one that knew courtship too well, and there he fell in love. I have heard him read many lectures against it.
  • ORLANDO
  • Can you remember any of the principal evils that he laid to the charge of women?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • No, I will not cast away my remedies but on those that are sick. There is a man haunts the forest that abuses our young plants with carving “Rosalind” on their barks, hangs odes upon hawthorns and elegies on brambles, all, for sooth, deifying the name of Rosalind. If I could meet that fancy-monger, I would give him some good counsel, for he seems to have the quotidian of love upon him.
  • ORLANDO
  • I am he that is so love-shaked. I pray you tell me your remedy.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • There is none of my uncle’s marks upon you. He taught me how to know a man in love.
  • ORLANDO
  • What were his marks?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • A lean cheek, which you have not; an unquestionable spirit, which you have not; a beard neglected, which you have not. Then your sleeve should be unbuttoned, your shoe untied, and everything about you demonstrating a careless desolation. But you are no such man. You are rather scrupulously neat, as loving yourself than seeming the lover of any other.
  • ORLANDO
  • Fair youth, I would I could make thee believe I love.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Me believe it? But are you he that hangs the verses on the trees wherein Rosalind is so admired.?
  • ORLANDO
  • I swear to thee, youth, I am that he, that unfortunate he.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak?
  • ORLANDO
  • Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Love is merely a madness. I profess curing it by counsel.
  • ORLANDO
  • Did you ever cure any so?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Yes, one, and in this manner.
  •  
  •  
  • Rosalind as Ganymede to Orlando, No. 1
  •  
  • He was to imagine me his mistress,
  • And I set him everyday to dismiss
  • All else and woo me. Then would I, being
  • A fickle youth, grieve, be effeminate,
  • Changeable, silly, longing, and liking,
  • Inconstant, full of tears; first passionate,
  • Then no passion for anything, as boys
  • And girls only can. I’d make squawkish noise,
  • Then entertain him, then forswear him, now
  • Weep for him, so that I drove my suitor
  • To seek a nook monastic; to allow
  • His love to become one of madness. For
  • Certain, I could leave your heart so bereft
  • That there shall be not one spot of love left.
  • ORLANDO
  • I would not be cured, youth.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I would cure you if you would but call me Rosalind and come every day to my cottage and woo me.
  • ORLANDO
  • Now, by the faith of love, I will. Tell me where it is.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Go with me to it, and I’ll show it you; and by the way you shall tell me where in the forest you live. Will you go?
  • ORLANDO
  • With all my heart, good youth.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Nay, you must call me Rosalind.
  • They exit.
  • Act 3, Scene 3
  • Touchstone and Audrey are on stage. Jaques enters.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Come apace, good Audrey. Am I the man yet? Doth my simple feature content you?
  • AUDREY
  • Lord protect us! What features?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • I am here with thee and thy goats, as the most fanciful poet. When a man’s verses cannot be understood, it strikes a man more dead than a great reckoning in a little room. Truly, I would the gods had made thee poetical.
  • AUDREY
  • I do not know what “poetical” is. Is it a true thing?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • No, truly, for the truest poetry is the most inventive, and lovers are given to poetry, and what they swear in poetry may be said as lovers they do invent.
  • AUDREY
  • Do you wish, then that the gods had made me poetical?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • I do, truly, for thou swear’st to me thou art honest.
  • AUDREY
  • Well, I am not fair, and therefore I pray the gods make me honest.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • I will marry thee, and to that end I have been with Sir Oliver Martext, the vicar on the next village, who hath promised to couple us.
  • AUDREY
  • Well, the gods give us joy.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Is the single man more blessed? No. As a walled town is more worthier than a village, so is the forehead of a married man more honorable than the bare brow of a bachelor.
  • Sir Oliver Martext enters.
  • OLIVER MARTEXT
  • Is there none here to give the woman?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • I will not take her on gift of any man.
  • OLIVER MARTEXT
  • Truly, she must be given, or the marriage is not lawful.
  • Jaques comes forward.
  • JAQUES
  • Proceed, proceed. I’ll give her. Will you be married, motley?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • As the ox hath his bow, sir.
  • JAQUES
  • And will you be married under a bush like a beggar? Get you to church, and have a good priest that can tell you what marriage is.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • He is not like to marry me well, and not being well married, it will be a good excuse for me hereafter to leave my wife.
  • JAQUES
  • Go thou with me, and let me counsel thee.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Farewell, good Master Oliver.
  • Audrey, Touchstone and Jaques exit.
  • OLIVER MARTEXT
  • ‘Tis no matter.
  • He exits.
  • Act 3, Scene 4
  • Rosalind dressed as Ganymede and Celia dressed as Aliena enter.
  • ROSALIND
  • Never talk to me. I will weep.
  • CELIA
  • Do, I prithee, but have the grace to consider that tears do not become a man.
  • ROSALIND
  • But have I not cause to weep?
  • CELIA
  • As good cause as one would desire. Therefore weep.
  • ROSALIND
  • But why did he swear he would come this morning, and comes not?
  • CELIA
  • Nay, certainly, there is no truth in him.
  • ROSALIND
  • Do you think so?
  • CELIA
  • Yes, I think he is not a pickpurse nor a horsestealer, but for his verity in love, I do think him as concave as a covered goblet or worm-eaten nut.
  • ROSALIND
  • Not true in love?
  • CELIA
  • Yes, when he is in, but I think he is not in.
  • ROSALIND
  • You have heard him swear downright he was.
  • CELIA
  • “Was” is not “is.” Besides, the oath of a lover is no stronger than the word of a tapster.
  • ROSALIND
  • I met the Duke yesterday and had much question with him. But what talk we of fathers when there is such a man as Orlando?
  • CELIA
  • He writes brave verses, and breaks them bravely.
  • Corin enters.
  • CORIN
  • Mistress and master, you have oft inquired after the shepherd that complained of love.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • Well, and what of him?
  • CORIN
  • If you will see a pageant truly played between the pale complexion of true love and the red glow of scorn and proud disdain, go hence a little, and I shall conduct you.
  • ROSALIND ASIDE TO CELIA
  • O come, let us remove. The sight of lovers feedeth those in love.
  • They exit.
  • Act 3, Scene 5
  • Silvius and Phoebe are on stage.
  • SILVIUS
  • Sweet Phoebe, do not scorn me. Say that you love me not, but say not so in bitterness.
  • Rosalind as Ganymede, Celia as Aliena and Corin enter unobserved.
  • PHOEBE
  • Now I do frown on thee with all my heart, and if mine eyes can wound, not let them kill thee. Now show the wound mine eye hath made in thee. Mine eyes, which I have darted at thee, have hurt thee not.
  • SILVIUS
  • O dear Phoebe, if ever you meet in some fresh cheek the power of fancy, then shall you know the wounds invisible that love’s keen arrows make.
  • PHOEBE
  • But till that time come not thou near me. And when that time comes, afflict me with thy mocks, pity me not, as till that time I shall not pity thee.
  • Rosalind as Ganymede comes forward.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Any why, I pray you? Who might be your mother, that you insult over the wretched? You foolish shepherd, wherefore do you follow her? You are a thousand times a more proper man than she a woman. ‘Tis such fools as you that makes the world full of ill-favored children. But, mistress, know yourself. Down on your knees and thank heaven, fasting, for a good man’s love, for I must tell you friendly in your ear, sell when you can; you are not for all markets. Cry the man mercy, love him, take his offer.
  • PHOEBE
  • Sweet youth, I had rather hear you chide than this man woo.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • He’s fall’n in love with your foulness.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO SILVIUS
  • And she’ll fall in love with my anger. If it be so, as fast as she answers thee with frowning looks, I’ll sauce her with bitter words.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO PHOEBE
  • Why look you so upon me?
  • PHOEBE
  • For no ill will I bear you.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I pray you, do not fall in love with me, for I am falser than vows made in wine. Besides, I like you not. Shepherdess, look on him better, and be not proud. Though all the world could see, none could be so abused in sight as he.
  • She, Celia and Corin exit.
  • PHOEBE
  • Know’st thou the youth that spoke to me erewhile?
  • SILVIUS
  • Not very well. He hath bought the cottage and the bounds that the old peasant once was master of.
  •  
  •  
  • Phoebe to Silvius
  •  
  • Now I find that saw of might “Who ever
  • Loved that loved not at first sight?” Now I ne’er
  • One to care for words, yet words do well when
  • He that speaks them pleases them that hears. He’s
  • Not a pretty youth, but sure proud
  • and then: His pride becomes him. The best thing one sees
  • Is his complexion; but, oh, faster than
  • His quick tongue can make offense, his eye can
  • Heal it up. His lip a riper red you
  • See than his cheek. Some women, Silvius,
  • Had they seen him as I, would be gone to
  • Fall in love with him, but for some of us
  • Hating or loving’s but a passing whim.
  • I’ve more cause to hate him than to love him.
  • PHOEBE
  • I’ll write him a very taunting letter, and thou shalt bear it. Wilt thou, Silvius?
  • SILVIUS
  • Phoebe, with all my heart.
  • PHOEBE
  • I will be bitter with him and very abrupt. Go with me, Silvius.
  • They exit.
  • Act 4, Scene 1
  • Rosalind as Ganymede, Celia as Aliena and Jaques are on stage.
  • JAQUES
  • I Prithee, pretty youth, let me be better acquainted with thee.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • They say you are a melancholy man.
  • JAQUES
  • I am so. I do love it better than laughing. ‘Tis good to be sad and say nothing.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Why then?
  • JAQUES
  • I have a melancholy of mine own, extracted from many objects, and indeed the diverse contemplation of my travels, in which my often rumination wraps me in a most humorous sadness.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • A traveler. I fear you have sold your own lands to see other men’s. Then to have seen much and to have nothing is to have rich eyes and poor hands.
  • JAQUES
  • Yes, I have gained my experience.
  • Orlando enters.
  • ORLANDO
  • Good day and happiness, dear Rosalind.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Farewell, Monsieur Traveler.
  • Jaques exits.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Why, how now, Orlando, where have you been all this while? You a lover?
  • ORLANDO
  • Pardon me, dear Rosalind.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Nay, an you be so tardy, come no more in my sight. I had as life be wooed of a snail.
  • ORLANDO
  • Of a snail?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Ay, of a snail, for though he comes slowly, he carries his house on his head. Besides, he brings his destiny with him.
  • ORLANDO
  • What’s that? Virtue is no hornmaker, and my Rosalind is virtuous.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • And I am your Rosalind. Come, woo me, for now I am in a holiday humor, and like enough to consent. What would you say to me now as I were your very, very Rosalind?
  • ORLANDO
  • I would kiss before I spoke.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Nay, you were better speak first, and when you were embarrassed for lack of matter, you might take occasion to kiss.
  • ORLANDO
  • How if the kiss be denied?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • There begins new matter. Am not I your Rosalind?
  • ORLANDO
  • I take some joy to say you are because I would be talking of her.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Well, in her person I say I will not have you.
  • ORLANDO
  • Then, in mine own person I die.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • The poor world is almost six thousand years old, and in all this time there was not any man died in his own person, in a love cause. Men have died from time to time, but not for love.
  • ORLANDO
  • I would not have my real Rosalind of this mind, for I protest her frown might kill me.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • By this hand, it will not kill a fly.
  • ORLANDO
  • Then love me, Rosalind.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Yes, faith, will I, Fridays and Saturdays and all.
  • ORLANDO
  • And wilt thou have me?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Come, sister, you shall be the priest and marry us. What do you say sister?
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • I cannot say the words.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • You must begin “Will you, Orlando------“
  • ORLANDO
  • I will.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Then you must say “I take thee, Rosalind, for wife.”
  • ORLANDO
  • I take thee, Rosalind, for wife.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Now tell me how long you would have her after you have possessed her?
  • ORLANDO
  • Forever and a day.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Say “a day” without the “ever.” No, no, Orlando, men are April when they woo, December when they wed.
  •  
  •  
  • Rosalind as Ganymede to Orlando, No. 2
  •  
  • Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky
  • Changes when they are wives. More jealous I
  • Will be of thee than a pigeon over
  • His hen, more clamorous than a parrot
  • Against rain, more taunting than calls that lure
  • Giddy monkeys. I’ll weep for nothing but
  • To disturb you when merry and will laugh
  • Loudly when thou doth choose to sleep. Distaff
  • Have good minds and can be quick and clever.
  • If you block their wit, ‘twill out a keyhole.
  • Be here by two if to be a lover;
  • Be among that gross band of unfaithful
  • If by one minute behind your hour miss.
  • Do beware my censure and keep your promise.
  • ORLANDO
  • Ay, sweet Rosalind. I’ll keep my promise with no less fidelity than if thou wert indeed my Rosalind. So, adieu.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Well, time is the old justice than examines all such offenders, and let time try. Adieu.
  • Orlando exits.
  • CELIA
  • You have simply misused our sex in your love prate.
  • ROSALIND
  • O coz, if thou didst know how many fathom deep I am in love. My affection hath an unknown bottom, like the Bay of Portugal.
  • CELIA
  • Or rather bottomless, that as fast as you pour affection in, it runs out.
  • ROSALIND
  • I’ll tell thee, Aliena, I cannot be out of the sight of Orlando. I’ll go find a shadow and sigh till he come.
  • CELIA
  • And I’ll sleep.
  • They exit.
  • Act 4, Scene 2
  • Jaques and some lords are in the forest.
  • JAQUES
  • Which is he that killed the deer?
  • FIRST LORD
  • Sir, it was I.
  • JAQUES
  • Let’s present him to the Duke like a Roman conqueror.
  • They exit.
  • Act 4, Scene 3
  • Rosalind dressed as Ganymede and Celia dressed as Aliena are on stage.
  • ROSALIND
  • Is it not past two o’clock?
  • CELIA
  • I warrant you he hath gone forth to sleep.
  • Silvius enters. He gives Rosalind a paper.
  • SILVIUS
  • I know not the contents, but as I guess it bears an angry tenor. I am but as a guiltless messenger.
  • Rosalind reads the letter.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • She says I am not fair; that I lack manners. She calls me proud and that she could not love me were man as rare as phoenix. Well, shepherd, this is a letter of your own device.
  • SILVIUS
  • No, I protest. Phoebe did write it.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Come, come, you are a fool, and turned into the extremity of love. I say she never did invent this letter. This is a man’s invention, and his hand. Why, she defies me like Turk to Christian. Women’s gentle brain could not drop forth such giant-rude invention. Will you hear the letter?
  • SILVIUS
  • So please you.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE READS
  • “He that brings this love to thee little knows this love in me. If by him my love deny, then I’ll study how to die.”
  • SILVIUS
  • Call you this chiding?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Not a word, for here comes more company.
  • Oliver enters.
  • OLIVER
  • Good morrow, fair ones. Pray you, if you know, a sheep cottage fenced about with olive trees.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • West of this place, down in the neighbor bottom.
  • OLIVER
  • If that an eye may profit by a tongue, then should I know you by description. Are not you the owner of the house I did inquire for?
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • It is no boast, being asked, to say we are.
  • OLIVER
  • Orlando doth commend him to you both, and to that youth he calls his Rosalind he sends this bloody handkerchief. Are you he?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I am. What must we understand by this?
  • OLIVER
  • Some of my shame, if you will know of me what man I am, and how, and why, and where this handkerchief was stained.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • I pray you tell it.
  •  
  •  
  • Oliver to Rosalind as Ganymede
  •  
  • When last the young Orlando parted from
  • Here, he said he would within an hour come
  • Back to you. Pacing through the forest he
  • Saw a wretched man sleeping on his back.
  • A lioness crouched near, and he did see
  • Him his elder brother. He did attack
  • The lioness, who quickly fell, waking
  • Me. Twice he had turned his back, but finding
  • Kindness nobler than revenge made him give
  • Battle. He then led me unto his cave
  • Where I saw flesh wounds and prayed that he live.
  • He fainted, crying Rosalind. I gave
  • Aid to his wounds; once he recovered he
  • Sent me, a stranger, to tell this story.
  • OLIVER
  • He sent me hither that you might excuse his broken promise.
  • Rosalind faints.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • Why, how now, Ganymede.
  • OLIVER
  • Many will swoon when they do look on blood.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • There is more in it.
  • OLIVER
  • Look, he recovers.
  • ROSALIND
  • I would I were at home.
  • Oliver helps Rosalind to rise.
  • OLIVER
  • You a man? You lack a man’s heart.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I do so; I confess it. I pray you tell your brother how well I counterfeited.
  • OLIVER
  • This was not counterfeit. There is too great testimony in your complexion that it was a passion of earnest.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Counterfeit, I assure you.
  • OLIVER
  • Well then, take a good heart, and counterfeit to be a man.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • So I do; but i’ faith, I should have been a woman by right.
  • CELIA AS ALIENA
  • Come, you look paler and paler. Good sir, go with us.
  • OLIVER
  • That will I, for I must bear answer back how you excuse my brother, Rosalind.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I shall devise something. But I pray you commend my counterfeiting to him.
  • They exit.
  • Act 5, Scene 1
  • Touchstone and Audrey are on stage.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Audrey, there is a youth here in the forest lays claim to you.
  • AUDREY
  • Ay, I know who ‘tis. He hath no interest in me in the world.
  • William enters.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • It is meat and drink to me to see a clown.
  • WILLIAM
  • Good ev’n Audrey.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • How old are you, friend?
  • WILLIAM
  • Five-and-twenty, sir.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • A ripe age. Is thy name William?
  • WILLIAM
  • William, sir.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Art thou wise?
  • WILLIAM
  • Ay, sir, I have a pretty wit.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Why, thou sayst well. I do remember a saying: “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.” You do love this maid?
  • WILLIAM
  • I do, sir.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Art thou learned?
  • WILLIAM
  • No, sir.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Then learn this of me: to have is to have. I am he.
  • WILLIAM
  • Which he, sir?
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • He, sir, that must marry this woman. Abandon the society of this female, or, clown, thou perishest; or, to thy better understanding, diest; or, to wit, I will translate thy life into death, thy liberty into bondage. Therefore tremble and depart.
  • AUDREY
  • Do, good William.
  • WILLIAM
  • God rest you merry, sir.
  • He exits. Corin enters.
  • CORIN
  • Our master and mistress seeks you.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Move quickly, Audrey. I attend, I attend.
  • They exit.
  • Act 5, Scene 2
  • Oliver and Orlando enter. Orlando has his arm in a sling.
  • ORLANDO
  • It ‘t possible that on so little acquaintance you should like her? That, but seeing, you should love her? And wooing, she should grant?
  • OLIVER
  • Neither call the giddiness of it in question, but say with me “I love Aliena”; consent with both that we may enjoy each other. It shall be to your good, for my father’s house and all the revenue that was old Sir Rowland’s will I estate upon you, and here live and die a shepherd.
  • Rosalind as Ganymede enters.
  • ORLANDO
  • You have my consent. Let your wedding be tomorrow.
  • Oliver exits.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • O my dear Orlando, how it grieves me to see thee wear thy heart in a scarf.
  • ORLANDO
  • It is my arm.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I thought thy heart had been wounded with the claws of a lion.
  • ORLANDO
  • Wounded it is, but with the eyes of a lady.
  • ROSALIND
  • Did your brother tell you how I counterfeited to swoon when he showed me your handkerchief?
  • ORLANDO
  • Ay, and greater wonders than that.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • O, I know where you are. Nay, ‘tis true.
  •  
  •  
  • Rosalind as Ganymede to Orlando, No. 3
  •  
  • Your brother and my sister no sooner
  • Looked but loved; he no sooner looked at her
  • But sighed, as then she; and no sooner sighed
  • But they asked one another the reason;
  • No sooner knew the reason but they eyed
  • A remedy; in these stages as one
  • They made the stairs to marriage, which they will
  • Climb tomorrow. Clubs cannot keep them still.
  • Now I speak to some purpose. Believe, sir,
  • If you please, I with magic am able
  • To do strange things. Doth seem in your gesture
  • ‘Tis Rosalind you love. Impossible
  • For me it’s not, to reduce your sorrow
  • To set her before your eyes tomorrow.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things. I have, since I was three years old, conversed with a magician, most profound in his art. If you do love Rosalind so near the heart as your gesture cries it out, when your brother marries Aliena shall you marry her.
  • ORLANDO
  • Speak’st thou in sober meanings?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • By my life I do, which I tender dearly, though I say I am a magician. Therefore put you in your best array, bid your friends; for if you will be married tomorrow, you shall, and to Rosalind, if you will.
  • Silvius and Phoebe enter.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Look, here comes a lover of mine and a lover of hers.
  • PHOEBE TO ROSALIND
  • Youth, you have done me much ungentleness to show the letter that I writ to you.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I care not if I have. You are there followed by a faithful shepherd. Look upon him, love him; he worships you.
  • PHOEBE TO SILVIUS
  • Good shepherd, tell this youth what ‘tis to love.
  • SILVIUS
  • It is to be all made of sighs and tears, and so am I for Phoebe.
  • PHOEBE
  • And I for Ganymede.
  • ORLANDO
  • And I for Rosalind.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • And I for no woman.
  • PHOEBE
  • If this be so, why blame you me to love you?
  • SILVIUS
  • If this be so, why blame you me to love you?
  • ORLANDO
  • If this be so, why blame you me to love you?
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Why do you speak too, “Why blame you me to love you?”
  • ORLANDO
  • To her that is not here, nor doth not hear.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • Pray you, no more of this.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO SILVIUS
  • I will help you if I can.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO PHOEBE
  • I will marry you if ever I marry woman, and I’ll be married tomorrow.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO ORLANDO
  • You shall be married tomorrow.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO SILVIUS
  • You shall be married tomorrow.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO ORLANDO
  • As you love Rosalind, meet.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO SILVIUS
  • As you love Phoebe, meet.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • And as I love no woman, I’ll meet. So fare you well.
  • SILVIUS
  • I’ll not fail, if I live.
  • PHOEBE
  • Nor I.
  • ORLANDO
  • Nor I.
  • They exit.
  • Act 5, Scene 3
  • Touchstone and Audrey are on stage.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Tomorrow is the joyful day, Audrey. Tomorrow will we be married.
  • AUDREY
  • I do desire it with all my heart, and I hope it is no dishonest desire to desire to be a woman of the world.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • Come, Audrey.
  • They exit.
  • Act 5, Scene 4
  • Duke Senior, Amiens, Orlando, Oliver and Celia as Aliena enter.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Dost thou believe, Orlando, that the boy can do all this that he hath promised?
  • ORLANDO
  • I sometimes do believe and sometimes do not, as those that fear they hope, and know they fear.
  • Silvius, Phoebe and Rosalind as Ganymede enter.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO DUKE SENIOR
  • You say, if I bring in your Rosalind, you will bestow her on Orlando here?
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • That would I, had I kingdoms to give with her.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO ORLANDO
  • And you say you will have her when I bring her?
  • ORLANDO
  • That would I.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO PHOEBE
  • You say you’ll marry me if I be willing?
  • PHOEBE
  • That will I.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • But if you do refuse to marry me, you’ll give yourself to this most faithful shepherd?
  • PHOEBE
  • So is the bargain.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE TO SILVIUS
  • You say that you’ll have Phoebe if she will?
  • SILVIUS
  • Though to have her and death were both one thing.
  • ROSALIND AS GANYMEDE
  • I have promised to make all this matter even. Keep you your word, O Duke, to give your daughter, you yours, Orlando, to receive his daughter. Keep your word, Phoebe, that you’ll marry me, or else, refusing me, to wed this shepherd. Keep your word, Silvius, that you’ll marry her if she refuse me. And from hence I go to make these doubts all even.
  • Rosalind and Celia exit.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • I do remember in this shepherd boy some lively touches of my daughter’s favor.
  • ORLANDO
  • My lord, the first time that I ever saw him methought he was a brother to your daughter. But, my good lord, this boy is forest-born, tutored by his uncle, reported to be a great magician.
  • Touchstone and Audrey enter.
  • JAQUES
  • Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all tongues are called fools. He hath been a courtier, he swears.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • I have flattered a lady. I have been politic with my friend, smooth with mine enemies.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • I like him very well.
  • TOUCHSTONE
  • I wish you the like. A poor virgin, sir, an ill-favored thing, sir, but mine own. A poor humor of mine, sir, to take that that no man else will. Rich honesty dwells like a miser, sir, in a poor house, as your pearl in your foul oyster.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • By my faith, he is very swift and sententious.
  • JAQUES TO DUKE SENIOR
  • Is not this a rare fellow, my lord? He’s as good at anything and yet a fool.
  • Rosalind and Celia enter.
  • ROSALIND TO DUKE SENIOR
  • To you I give myself, for I am yours.
  • ROSALIND TO ORLANDO
  • To you I give myself, for I am yours.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • If there be truth in sight, you are my daughter.
  • ORLANDO
  • If there be truth in sight, you are my Rosalind.
  • PHOEBE
  • If sight and shape be true, why then, my love adieu.
  • ROSALIND TO DUKE SENIOR
  • I’ll have no father, if you be not he.
  • ROSALIND TO ORLANDO
  • I’ll have no husband, if you be not he.
  • ROSALIND TO PHOEBE
  • Nor ne’er wed woman, if you be not she.
  • Hyman, the mythical god of marriage, enters.
  • HYMAN
  • Peace, ho! I bar confusion. ‘Tis I must make conclusion of these strange events.
  • HYMAN TO ROSALIND AND ORLANDO
  • You and you no cross shall part.
  • HYMAN TO CELIA AND OLIVER
  • You and you are heart in heart.
  • HYMAN TO PHOEBE
  • You to his love most accord or have a woman to your lord.
  • HYMAN TO AUDREY AND TOUCHSTONE
  • You and you are sure together as the winter is foul weather.
  • DUKE SENIOR TO CELIA
  • O my dear niece, welcome thou art to me, even daughter, welcome in no less degree.
  • PHOEBE TO SILVIUS
  • I will not eat my word! Now thou art mine, thy faith my fancy to thee doth combine.
  • Jacques de Boys, the second brother, enters.
  • SECOND BROTHER
  • Let me have audience for a word or two. Duke Frederick, hearing how that every day men of great worth resorted to this forest, addressed by a mighty power, was converted both from his enterprise and from the world, his crown bequeathing to his banished brother. This to be true I do engage my life.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Welcome, young man. Thou offer’st fairly to thy brothers’ wedding: to one his lands withheld, and to the other a land itself at large, a potent dukedom. Every of this happy number shall share the good of our returned fortune. Meantime, forget this new-fall’n dignity, and fall into our rustic revelry. Play, music.
  • JAQUES TO THE SECOND BROTHER
  • Sir, by your patience: if I heard you rightly, the Duke hath put on a religious life and thrown into neglect the pompous court.
  • SECOND BROTHER
  • He hath.
  • DUKE SENIOR
  • Proceed, proceed. We’ll begin these rites, as we do trust they’ll end, in true delights.
  • They dance. All exit but Rosalind.
  •  
  •  
  • Rosalind with Epilogue
  •  
  • It is no less improper the lady
  • Provide the epilogue than you to see
  • The lord the prologue. If be true a good
  • Wine needs no advertisement, ‘tis true that
  • A good play needs no epilogue. Yet could
  • Not good wine as good plays prove better at
  • Self-betterment? To beg will not become
  • Me, not dressed as a beggar; yet in some
  • Way I want to summon you. I’ll begin
  • With women: for the love you bear for men,
  • Enjoy this play with all the love within
  • You. Men, for the love you bear to women,
  • And none of you hate them, as each here sees,
  • May for you and your women the play please.
  • ROSALIND
  • When I make curtsy, bid me farewell.
  • She exits.

Copyright © 2010 Simplified Shakespeare

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