The Taming of the Shrew simplified

Synopsis

This zany love-comedy, set in “fair Padua, nursery of the arts, the pleasant garden of great Italy,” opens when the well-heeled, happy, over-reaching Lucentio, a young man from Pisa, tells his servant, Tranio, how pleased he is to be in Padua.  He has come to Padua to immerse himself, as he says, in the happiness branch of philosophy that leads to virtue.  Being young men, the more skeptical Tranio suggests that Lucentio tone down his dreams and that while in Padua he should “resolve to suck the sweets of sweet philosophy,” but “in brief, sir, study what you most like.” Lucentio responds “Thanks, Tranio, well dost thou advise.”

As these two are talking, Baptista Minola, his daughters, and two of his younger daughter’s suitors enter, Bianca being the younger daughter. Lucentio and Tranio step aside, Lucentio having fallen for Bianca at first sight. Baptista lets Bianca’s suitors know that he is resolved “not to bestow my youngest daughter before I have a husband for the elder.” As Baptista sends Bianca inside their home, she says “my books and instruments shall be my company, on them to look and practice by myself.”  After Baptista and his daughters exit, Bianca’s suitors, Hortensio and Gremio, agree that if either one of them is to win Bianca, they must find a way to “get a husband for her sister.”  Lucentio and Tranio have overheard it all. How these guys, Lucentio included, go about competing to win Bianca, knowing they first have to find a husband for Katherine, is the essence of the comedy, Katherine being the older sister, the ‘shrew.’ She is also known as “Katherine the curst.” 

Hortensio and Gremio have now left the stage.  The smitten Lucentio and his buddy Tranio try to develop a strategy as to how he (Lucentio) might go about getting to meet Bianca, spend some time with her and woo her.  Tranio suggests that he “be a schoolmaster and undertake the teaching of the maid,” Bianca, as we say, having told her father that her books and instruments would keep her company.  We learn that Baptista happens to know Lucentio’s father, Vincentio of Pisa, and since Lucentio has really taken an interest in Bianca, the two of them decide that it might be in Lucentio’s best interest if they disguise themselves, Lucentio as a teacher; Tranio as Lucentio.  A note here: Shakespeare often runs rampant with disguises.  By adding this kind of mischief to his plays, Shakespeare makes keeping track of who is who in his plays a challenge.  The challenge he offers in this play is as tough as any.

By sheer happenstance, Petruchio, a young man from Verona, enters, coming to Padua to visit his friend Hortensio (one of Bianca’s suitors).  Petruchio’s servant Grumio is with him.  Petruchio tells Hortensio that “I come to wive wealthily in Padua; if wealthily, then happily in Padua.”  Hortensio tells Petruchio that he has the perfect wife in mind for him, and that he may “thank me but a little for my counsel, yet I’ll promise thee she shall be rich, and very rich.”  Hortensio tells him the young woman he suggests is Katherine Minola. Petruchio says, “I know her father, though I know her not.”  Hortensio lets Petruchio know of Baptista’s plan for his two daughters, and that he has a real interest in the younger one.  Petruchio likes what he hears.  Following a discussion of how they might pull this off, Petruchio agrees to help disguise Hortensio as a teacher, and that not only will he introduce the disguised-as-a-schoolteacher Hortensio to Baptista, but that he’ll suggest to her father that he hire him as a teacher for his daughter Bianca.  Meanwhile, Gremio enters with Lucentio, now disguised as Cambio, a poetry teacher, and introduces the disguised-as-Cambio Lucentio to his friend Hortensio as a “schoolmaster for fair Bianca,” Hortensio having now disguised himself as Litio, a music teacher.  Hortensio in turn introduces Petruchio to Gremio as a gentleman who “will undertake to woo curst Katherine;” Gremio being, as we say, his friend and fellow Bianca-suitor.  Gremio says to Hortensio, “Have you told him all her faults?”   Overhearing the question, Petruchio says “I know she is irksome, but I hear no harm.”

Meanwhile, Tranio enters, now disguised as Lucentio.  He asks Gremio and Hortensio (disguised as Litio) how to get to the Minola home.  Both react quickly, being concerned that he might be a competitor for Bianca’s attention, both telling him that she doesn’t need another suitor.  Tranio-as-Lucentio says “So, Helen of Troy had a thousand wooers.”  When asked if he knows that Baptista has two daughters, Petruchio, having stepped aside, jumps in saying “The first’s for me; let her go by.”  Tranio-as-Lucentio then says, “One may do as adversaries, but eat and drink as friends.”  Tranio-as-Lucentio, Gremio and Hortensio end up getting along just fine, each having the common objective of finding a way to match-up Petruchio with Katherine. 

In the Minola home, an angry Katherine binds Bianca’s hands, demanding that she tell her which one of her suitors “she would fancy more than the other.”  Their father unties Bianca’s hands asking Katherine why she “wrongs her.”  Katherine responds “Her silence flouts me, and I’ll be revenged.”  Meanwhile the charming Petruchio enters, introduces himself to Baptista as Antonio’s son, and introduces his friend Hortensio to Baptista as Litio, “a man most skilled in music and the fine sciences of mathematics.” Smooth-talking Petruchio uses the opportunity to ask Baptista for permission to woo his older daughter Katherine. A pleased Baptista, having told Petruchio how much he admires his father Antonio, says “Well mayst thou woo, and happy be thy speed.”  Gremio then enters and introduces Lucentio (disguised as Cambio) to Baptista, telling him he is “as cunning in Greek and Latin as in music and mathematics.”  Baptista hires both Litio and Cambio as his daughters’ teachers. Tranio-as-Lucentio, to complete the ruse, then introduces himself to Baptista as Lucentio, the son of Vincentio. Grumio (Petruchio’s aide) earlier had said “Here’s to knavery!  See, to beguile the old folks, how the young folks lay their heads together.”

All did not go well during the first music lesson Litio offered Katherine; Katherine having broken the lute over Litio’s head.  Trying to bring peace to the family, Baptista suggests he offer his music lessons to Bianca.  Litio tells Baptista that the lute-over-the-head issue happened when he told her “she mistook her frets and with that word she struck me on the head while she did call me ‘rascal fiddler’ and ‘twangling Jack,’ with twenty such vile terms, as had she studied to misuse me so.” Separately, Katherine does her best to irritate Petruchio, but he pleasantly persists, telling us how he plans to woo her. With the two of them having been together for but a brief time, Petruchio, when asked by her father “Now, Signior Petruchio, how speed you with my daughter” proceeds to announce to all that he and Katherine are to be married on Sunday, which ignites a scramble between Gremio and Tranio-as-Lucentio for Baptista’s approval to woo Bianca, now that Katherine plans to get married.

Baptista decides to set-up an auction of sorts for Bianca, saying he who “can assure my daughter greatest dower shall have my Bianca’s love.” Gremio acknowledges he is ‘outbid’ by Tranio, still disguised as Lucentio.  But ever cautious Baptista tells Tranio-as-Lucentio that his father Vincentio must “make her the assurance,” since Tranio-as-Lucentio’s proposal depends on his inheritance from his “father.”  Tranio quickly realizes that he might be in trouble since a “supposed Lucentio must beget a father called supposed Vincentio.”

Meanwhile, with Katherine’s wedding set for Sunday, Lucentio-as-Cambio and Hortensio-as-Litio, both still pretending to be school teachers, both still most interested in Bianca, aggressively compete to win the younger sister.  Sparring verbally in her presence, Bianca says “To cut off all strife, here set we down.”  She deals with both diplomatically, soon leaving them to help her older sister get ready for the wedding.  Later, Baptista and others enter near the church, Baptista saying “This is the ‘pointed day that Katherine and Petruchio should be married” and asks “yet we hear not of our son-in-law.”  Katherine says “No shame but mine. I must be forced to give my hand.”  But Petruchio soon arrives on a broken-down horse along with his servant Grumio, both absurdly dressed. Baptista says “I am glad he’s come, howsoe’er he comes.”  Petruchio is upbeat, asking “But where is Kate?”  They soon marry.  We quickly learn second-hand that during the wedding ceremony Petruchio embarrassed everyone with his lack of deportment. Shortly after the ceremony, Petruchio announces that he has to leave and does.  When pressed, Petruchio tells all not to worry; that he’ll defend and protect his wife; that she is his, as is his horse and house.  He exits, saying “Fear not, sweet wench.”  Gremio says “Petruchio is Kated.” 

At his home in the country, Petruchio continues with his plan to ‘tame’ Katherine, being generally obnoxious, abusing his servants while denying his wife food and sleep.  Meanwhile, back at the Minola home, having observed Lucentio (still disguised as Cambio) kissing and whispering to Bianca, Hortensio gives up his masquerade and effort to woo Bianca, vowing to marry the Widow “who hath loved me from my call long ago.”  He leaves to join Petruchio.  Separately, Biondello, another servant to Lucentio, meets a Merchant and suggests to Lucentio that the Merchant would make a good stand-in for Lucentio’s father, Vincentio.  Lucentio likes the idea. The Merchant readily agrees to play the role. 

Petruchio and Grumio continue to tease and taunt Katherine over food, a gown, and a cap, showing little mercy.  They make plans to leave for her father’s home. Later, the Merchant, who is playing the role of Vincentio beautifully, fears that Baptista, when they are introduced, might recognize him for who he really is.  He need not have worried. Hearing the Merchant out, Baptista agrees that Vincentio’s ‘son,’ Lucentio, may marry Bianca, conditioned “that like a father you will deal with him and pass my daughter a sufficient dower.”  They prepare to call the priest.  Lucentio understandably worries how his having been disguised as Cambio will set with Bianca, once Bianca recognizes him and the others for who they really are.  Again, he need not have worried. 

While Petruchio, Katherine and Hortensio are on their way to the Minola home they meet the real Vincentio (Lucentio’s father), who just happens to be headed for Padua “to visit a son of mine which long I have not seen.”  The four of them travel together to Padua, Petruchio saying “Happily met, the happier for thy son.”  Hortensio and the Widow return to Padua and marry.  Lucentio and Bianca marry.  The real Vincentio shows up at Lucentio’s home looking for his son.  As one might imagine, Petruchio and Vincentio have a lively who-is-really-who confrontation with the Merchant, still disguised as Vincentio, and Tranio, still disguised as Lucentio, and with Baptista.  Gremio, having earlier been considered somewhat of a fool, in true Shakespeare fashion, finally steps in, saving the moment.  All principals gather for Lucentio and Bianca’s wedding reception where Lucentio heals recent verbal wounds, saying “At long last, our jarring notes agree, and time to smile at escapes and perils past.”  The party ends when Petruchio, who has ‘tamed’ Katherine, has her tell Bianca and the Widow, to everyone’s total astonishment “what duty they owe their husbands.”

Principal Characters

Baptista.  Baptista is Baptista Minola, the girls’ father, a wealthy merchant.  The heart of the comedy originates early when Baptista says, “Gentlemen I want you to know my plan is not to bestow my youngest daughter before I have a husband for the elder,” Katherine being the elder.  Much of the comedy results from the time he tells Gremio and Hortensio that “I know she (Bianca, the younger) taketh most delight in music, instruments, and poetry.” 

Bianca.  Bianca is Baptista Minola’s younger daughter.  She is the love interest of three men in the play: Hortensio, Lucentio, and Gremio.  She doesn’t have many lines, but Shakespeare leads us believe that she was quite the eye-catching young woman.

Biondello.  Biondello is one of Lucentio’s two servants; the other being Tranio. 

Gremio.  Gremio is billed as a pantaloon, defined as “a slender, foolish old man wearing tight trousers,” or as a “ridiculous old man, a stock character in Italian comedy of the period.”  Gremio is one of Bianca’s three suitors, but apparently never had a serious chance of winning her. Gremio and Hortensio are friends.  If he is a “ridiculous old man,” Shakespeare gives this ridiculous old man some very good lines, much as he does fools in other plays.

Grumio.  Grumio is one of Petruchio’s servants.  Biondello refers to him as Petruchio’s lackey.  His role is limited.

Hortensio.  Hortensio is one of Bianca’s serious suitors.  He seems to be a fine and talented guy.  He disguises himself as Litio, a schoolmaster, securing a position in Baptista’s household as Bianca’s music and mathematics teacher, giving him, he thinks, the front-running opportunity to woo her.  He loses Bianca to Lucentio.  He marries the Widow who “loved him from his call long ago.”

Katherine.   Katherine is Katherina Minola, known as Katherine, Katherina, or Kate.  She is the shrew, and known as Katherine the curst, tamed by Petruchio.  She is the older sister.  Her father says she must be married before any man may woo her younger sister Bianca; Bianca receiving attention from a number of men, irritating Katherine, for sure. 

Lucentio.  Lucentio is a fine young man from Pisa who has come to Padua to study the arts.  His servants are Tranio and Biondello.  His father is Vincentio.  Having early in the play fallen for Bianca, he disguises himself as Cambio, a schoolmaster, a teacher of literature and poetry, believing it’s his best chance to be with Bianca and, like Hortensio, to secretly woo her.   He wins Bianca.  He and Gremio turn out to be the best of peace makers.

Petruchio.  Petruchio is a wealthy young man from Verona who has come to Padua to see friends, mostly his “approved friend, Hortensio.”  His father’s name was Antonio; Baptista saying “he knew him well.”  Petruchio woos the “shrew,” Katherine, and “tames” her, having said he is in Padua to find a wealthy bride. Katherine meets that test. 

Tranio.  Tranio is one of Lucentio’s two servants.  Tranio is the resourceful and talented young man Shakespeare created to conduct this play, had this play been written as a symphony.  For most of the play Tranio masquerades as Lucentio, with quick and witty responses in tight situations.  He’s great.

The Play


  • Act 1, Scene 1
  • Lucentio and his servant, Tranio, enter on a street in Padua.
  •  
  •  
  • Lucentio to Tranio, No. 1
  •  
  • Tranio, with my father’s love and my
  • Great desire, armed with his goodwill and thy
  • Good company, happily now we’ve met
  • In Padua, the pleasant garden of
  • Great Italy, nursery of arts. Let
  • Us here institute a course for the love
  • Of learning with ingenious studies;
  • Studies that come to serve all hopes to please
  • My father, to deck his fortune with good
  • Deeds. Therefore, Tranio, unabated
  • Virtue is the philosophy that should
  • Lead me from Pisa, like an unsated
  • Man, when leaving a shallow pond, doth first
  • Plunge into the deep pool to quench his thirst.
  •  
  •  
  • Tranio to Lucentio
  •  
  • Pardon me, gentle master. I am all
  • Affected as you and too seek the call
  • To continue to suck the sweets of sweet
  • Philosophy. But good master, while we
  • Do admire this virtue and want to meet
  • This test of moral discipline, let’s be
  • Neither stoics nor artless, I pray, or
  • Risk renouncing the appeal of love for
  • Devotion to Aristotle’s checks. Balk
  • Logic and mathematics with your friends,
  • And practice rhetoric in your common talk,
  • And use sweet poetry to lively ends.
  • No profit grows where pleasure’s not taken.
  • Study what you like or be forsaken.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Thanks, Tranio, well dost thou advise.
  • Baptista, his daughters, Katherine and Bianca, and Gremio and Hortensio, suitors to the young women enter.
  • LUCENTIO
  • What company is this?
  • TRANIO
  • Master, some show to welcome us to town.
  • Lucentio and Tranio step aside.
  • BAPTISTA TO GREMIO AND HORTENSIO
  • Gentlemen, for how I firmly am resolved you know: that is, not to bestow my youngest daughter before I have a husband for the elder.
  • KATHERINE TO BAPTISTA
  • I pray you, sir, is it your will too make a laughingstock of me amongst these mates?
  • HORTENSIO
  • How mean you that? No mates for you, unless you were of gentler, milder mold.
  • KATHERINE
  • I’ faith, sir, certainly it is not halfway to her heart, but if it were, doubt not her care to paint your face and use you like a fool.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Good Lord, deliver us!
  • TRANIO ASIDE TO LUCENTIO
  • That wench is stark mad or ungovernable.
  • LUCENTIO ASIDE TO TRANIO
  • But in the other’s silence do I see maid’s mild behavior and sobriety.
  • BAPTISTA TO GREMIO AND HORTENSIO
  • Gentlemen, that I may soon make good what I have said --- Bianca, get you in.
  • KATHERINE
  • A pretty pet! She should make herself cry, if she had some excuse.
  • BIANCA
  • Sister, content you in my discontent. Sir, to your pleasure humbly I subscribe. My books and instruments shall be my company, on them to look and practice by myself.
  • Bianca exits.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Gentlemen, content you, for I know she taketh most delight in music, instruments, and poetry. Schoolmasters will I keep within my house fit to instruct her youth. If you, Hortensio, or Signior Gremio, you know any such, prefer them hither. Katherine, you may stay.
  • He exits.
  • KATHERINE
  • Why, and I trust I may go too, may I not? Ha!
  • She exits.
  • GREMIO
  • If I can by any means light on a fit man to teach her that wherein she delights, I will wish him to her father.
  • HORTENSIO
  • So will I, Signior Gremio. But a word, I pray. Know now upon advice, it toucheth us both to labor and effect one thing specially.
  • GREMIO
  • What’s that, I pray?
  • HORTENSIO
  • Marry, sir to get a husband for her sister.
  • GREMIO
  • Think’st thou, Hortensio, though her father be very rich, any man is so very a fool to be married to hell?
  • HORTENSIO
  • But come, by helping Baptista’s eldest daughter to a husband we set his youngest free for a husband. He that runs fastest greets the ring. How say you, Signior Gremio?
  • GREMIO
  • I am agreed.
  • Gremio and Hortensio exit. Tranio and Lucentio remain on stage.
  • TRANIO
  • I pray, sir, tell me, is it possible that love should of a sudden take such hold?
  •  
  •  
  • Lucentio to Tranio, No. 2
  •  
  • O Tranio, till now I never thought
  • I’d find, standing idly, what I have sought:
  • The effect of love-in-idleness. O
  • Yes, I saw her face and my heart’s a whirl.
  • I burn, I pine! I perish, Tranio,
  • If I achieve not this young modest girl.
  • Do counsel and assist me, for I know
  • Thou canst; for I know thou wilt, Tranio,
  • For thy counsel’s plainness is sound. I saw
  • Her coral lips move and confess I thought
  • Her sacred breath did perfume the air. Ah,
  • What a cruel father’s he! But art thou not
  • Advised he plans to keep a schoolmaster
  • There within his house fit to instruct her?
  • TRANIO
  • Master, it is no time to chide you now. Affection is not chided from the heart. If love have touched you, ransom yourself from capture for as little money as possible.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Thanks, lad. Go forward. This makes me content, for thy counsel’s sound.
  • TRANIO
  • Master, you looked so longingly on the maid, perhaps you did not notice the essence of all.
  • LUCENTIO
  • O yes, I saw sweet beauty in her face.
  • TRANIO
  • Ay, marry, am I, sir --- and now ‘tis plotted!
  • LUCENTIO
  • I have it, Tranio!
  • TRANIO
  • Both our inventions meet and jump in one.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Tell me thine first.
  • TRANIO
  • You will be schoolmaster and undertake the teaching of the maid: that’s your device.
  • LUCENTIO
  • It is. May it be done?
  • TRANIO
  • Not possible. For who shall bear your part and be in Padua here Vincentio’s son, welcome his friends, visit his countrymen and banquet them?
  • LUCENTIO
  • Enough, content thee. We have not yet been seen in any house, nor can we be distinguished by our faces for man or master. Then it follow thus: Thou shalt be master, Tranio, in my stead, keep house, and port, and servants, as I should. I will some other be, some Florentine, some Neapolitan, or meaner man of Pisa. Take my colored hat and cloak.
  • They exchange clothes.
  • LUCENTIO
  • When Biondello comes, he waits on thee, and I will charm him first to keep his tongue.
  • TRANIO
  • In brief sir, I am tied to be obedient. I am content to be Lucentio.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Tranio, be so, because Lucentio loves, and let me be a slave, t’ achieve that maid whose sudden sight hath thrilled my wounded eye.
  • Biondello enters
  • LUCENTIO
  • Sirrah, where have you been?
  • BIONDELLO
  • Where have I been? Where are you? Has my fellow Tranio stolen your clothes? Or you stolen his? What’s the news?
  • LUCENTIO
  • Sirrah, come hither. Tranio here, to save my life, puts my apparel and my appearance on, for in a quarrel since I came ashore I killed a man and fear I was described. Wait you on him, while I make way from hence to save my life. You understand me?
  • BIONDELLO
  • Ay, sir.
  • BIONDELLO ASIDE
  • Ne’er a whit.
  • LUCENTIO
  • And not a jot of “Tranio” in your mouth. Tranio is changed into Lucentio.
  • BIONDELLO
  • The better for him. Would I were so too.
  • TRANIO
  • But, sirrah, not for my sake, but your master’s, I advise you use your manners discreetly in all kind of companies. When I am alone, why then I am Tranio; but in all places else, your master Lucentio.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Tranio, let’s go.
  • They exit.
  • Act 1, Scene 2
  • Petruchio and his man, Grumio, enter, having just arrived in Padua.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Verona, for a while I take my leave to see my friends in Padua, but of all my best beloved and approved friend, Hortensio.
  • Hortensio enters.
  • HORTENSIO
  • My old friend Grumio and my good friend Petruchio? Tell me, what happy gale blows you to Padua here from old Verona?
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to Hortensio
  •  
  • Scattered by such wind, young men choose to roam
  • The world seeking fortunes away from home,
  • Where experience slowly grows. To wive,
  • I thrust myself into this maze, as best
  • I may. I have crowns in my purse to thrive,
  • And with goods at home come to see the rest
  • Of the world. Hortensio, if thou know
  • One rich enough to be my wife, I’ll owe
  • Thee much, be she most foul, or at the worst,
  • Moves not love nor affection’s edge in me;
  • Be she as Socrates’ shrew; be she curst
  • And uncouth as the Adriatic Sea.
  • I’m in Padua to wive wealthily;
  • If wealthily, then I wive happily.
  • HORTENSIO
  • I can, Petruchio, help thee to a wife with wealth enough, and young and beauteous, brought up as best becomes a gentlewoman. Her only fault is that she is intolerable curst, and shrewd. I would not wed her for a mine of gold.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Thou know’st not gold’s effect. Tell me her father’s name, and ‘tis enough.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Her father is Baptista Minola, an affable and courteous gentleman. Her name is Katherina Minola, renowned in Padua for her scolding tongue.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I know her father, though I know not her, and he knew my deceased father well. I will not sleep, Hortensio, till I see her.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Tarry, Petruchio, I must go with thee, for in Baptista’s keep my treasure is. He hath the jewel of my life in hold, his youngest daughter, beautiful Bianca. Baptista hath ordered that none shall have access unto Bianca till Katherine the curst have got a husband.
  • GRUMIO
  • “Katherine the curst,” a title for a maid, of all titles the worst.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Now shall my friend Petruchio do me grace and offer me disguised in sober robes to old Baptista as a schoolmaster well seen in music, to instruct Bianca, that so I may have leave and leisure to make love to her and unsuspected court her by herself.
  • Gremio enters with Lucentio who is disguised as Cambio, a schoolmaster.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Peace, it is the rival of my love. Petruchio, stand by awhile.
  • Petruchio, Hortensio and Grumio stand aside.
  • GREMIO TO LUCENTIO
  • Hark you, sir, I’ll have them very fairly bound, all books of love. What will you read to her?
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO
  • Whate’er I read to her, I’ll plead for you as for my patron.
  • GREMIO
  • O this learning, what a thing it is!
  • GRUMIO ASIDE
  • What a dupe, what a thing it is!
  • PETRUCHIO ASIDE
  • Peace, sirrah.
  • HORTENSIO ASIDE
  • Grumio, mum.
  • Hortensio comes forward.
  • HORTENSIO
  • God save you, Signior Gremio.
  • GREMIO
  • And you are well met, Signior Hortensio. I am going to Baptista Minola. I promised to enquire carefully about a schoolmaster for the fair Bianca, and by good fortune I have lighted well on this young man, well read in poetry, and other good books, I warrant you.
  • HORTENSIO
  • ‘Tis well. And I have met a gentleman hath promised me to help me to another, a fine musician to instruct our mistress.
  • GREMIO
  • Beloved of me, and that my deeds shall prove.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Gremio, ‘tis now no time to vent our love. Listen to me.
  • He presents Petruchio.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Here is a gentleman whom by chance I met and will undertake to woo curst Katherine, yea, and to marry her, if her dowry please.
  • GREMIO
  • Hortensio, have you told him all her faults?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I know she is an irksome, brawling scold. If that be all, masters, I hear no harm.
  • GREMIO
  • No? Sayst me so, friend? What countryman?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Born in Verona, old Antonio’s son. My father dead, my fortune lives for me.
  • GREMIO
  • Oh, sir, such a life with such a wife were strange. But will you woo this wildcat?
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to Gremio
  •  
  • Will I live? Why came I hither but to
  • That intent? What do you think I am? You
  • Think a little din can daunt mine ears? I
  • Have heard pow’rful ordnance in the field
  • And heaven’s artillery in the sky.
  • Now listen men, if you will. Would I yield
  • To this brawling scold, having in my time
  • Heard the sea, puffed up with angry winds, whine
  • Like a boar chafed with sweat? Mine’s a tough soul
  • Having heard lions roar and cats harangue
  • The moon. Have I not in a pitched battle
  • Heard loud ‘larms, neighing steeds and trumpets clang?
  • A woman’s tongue is not half the crier
  • As is a chestnut in a farmer’s fire.
  • GREMIO
  • Hortensio, hark. This gentleman is happily arrived, for his own good and yours.
  • HORTENSIO
  • I promised we would be contributors and bear his charge of wooing whatsoe’er.
  • GREMIO
  • And so we will, provided that he win her.
  • Tranio enters disguised as Lucentio, along with Biondello.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Tell me, I beseech you, which is the readiest way to the house of Signior Baptista Minola?
  • BIONDELLO
  • He that has the two fair daughters --- is ‘t he you mean?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Even he, Biondello.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Are you a suitor to the maid you talk of, yea or no?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • An if I be, sir, is it any offense?
  • GREMIO
  • For this reason, if you’ll know: that she’s the choice love of Signior Gremio.
  • HORTENSIO
  • That she’s the chosen of Signior Hortensio.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Softly, my masters. Baptista is a noble gentleman to whom my father is not all unknown, and were his daughter fairer than she is, she may more suitors have, and me for one. Helen of Troy had a thousand wooers. Then well one more may fair Bianca have. And so she shall. Lucentio shall make one.
  • GREMIO
  • What, this gentleman will out-talk us all!
  • HORTENSIO TO TRANIO
  • Did you yet ever see Baptista’s daughter?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • No, sir, but hear I do that he hath two, the one as famous for a scolding tongue as is the other for beauteous modesty.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Sir, sir, the first’s for me; let her go by. The father keeps the youngest daughter from all access of suitors and will not promise her to any man until the elder sister first be wed.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Since you do profess to be a suitor, you must, as we do, gratify this gentleman, to whom we all rest generally beholding.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Sir, I shall not be slack; we may do as adversaries do in law, strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
  • GRUMIO AND BIONDELLO
  • O excellent motion! Fellows, let’s be gone.
  • HORTENSIO
  • The motion’s good indeed. Petruchio, I will introduce you; I will ensure your welcome.
  • They exit.
  • Act 2, Scene 1
  • Katherine and Bianca enter, Bianca with her hands tied.
  • BIANCA
  • Good sister, wrong me not, nor wrong yourself. Unbind my hands.
  • KATHERINE
  • Of all thy suitors here I charge thee tell whom thou lov’st best.
  • BIANCA
  • Believe me, sister, I never yet beheld that special face which I could fancy more than any other.
  • KATHERINE
  • Minion, thou liest. Is ‘t not Hortensio?
  • BIANCA
  • I prithee, sister Kate, untie my hands.
  • Katherine strikes her. Baptista enters.
  • BAPTISTA: Bianca, stand aside.
  • He unties her hands.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Why dost thou wrong her that did ne’er wrong thee?
  • KATHERINE
  • Her silence flouts me, and I’ll be revenged!
  • She goes after Bianca. Bianca exits.
  • KATHERINE
  • What, will you not suffer me? Nay, now I see she is your treasure. She must have a husband. Talk not to me. I will go sit and weep till I can find occasion of revenge.
  • She exits.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Was ever gentleman thus grieved as I? But who comes here?
  • Gremio, Lucentio disguised as Cambio, Petruchio, Hortensio disguised as Litio, and Tranio as Lucentio.
  • GREMIO
  • Good morrow, neighbor Baptista.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • And you, good sir. Pray, have you not a daughter called Katherina, fair and virtuous?
  • BAPTISTA
  • I have a daughter, sir, called Katherina.
  • GREMIO TO PETRUCHIO
  • You are too blunt. Go to it orderly.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • You wrong me, Signior Gremio. Give me leave.
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to Baptista, No. 1
  •  
  • I’m a gentleman of Verona, sir,
  • That on hearing of her beauty and her
  • Wit, her affability and bashful
  • Modesty, her wondrous nature and mild
  • Behavior, do ask that I may, to lull
  • My heart, be a guest in your house, beguiled
  • As I am, to let mine eye be witness
  • To the reports that have left me restless.
  • Let me present you with a man of mine,
  • As my gift to be received as a guest,
  • A man most skilled in music and the fine
  • Sciences of mathematics, the best
  • Of teachers, my knowing much she doth know.
  • This man of Mantua is Litio.
  • BAPTISTA
  • You’re welcome, sir, and he for your good sake. But for my daughter Katherine, this I know, she is not right for you, the more my grief.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I see you do not mean to part with her, or else you like not of my company.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Mistake me not. I speak but as I find. What may I call your name?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Petruchio is my name, Antonio’s son.
  • BAPTISTA
  • I know him well. You are welcome for his sake.
  • GREMIO
  • Let us that are poor petitioners speak too!
  • PETRUCHIO
  • O, pardon me, signior Gremio.
  • Gremio presents Lucentio, disguised as Cambio.
  • GREMIO
  • This young scholar that hath been long studying at Rheims, as cunning in Greek and Latin, as in music and mathematics. His name is Cambio. Pray accept his service.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Welcome, good Cambio.
  • BAPTISTA TO TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • May I be so bold to know the cause of your coming?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Being a stranger in this city here do make myself a suitor to your daughter, unto Bianca, fair and virtuous. This liberty is all that I request, that, upon knowledge of my parentage, I may have welcome ‘mongst the rest that woo with favor as the rest. Toward the education of your daughters I here bestow this small packet of Greek and Latin books.
  • Biondello comes forward with the gifts.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Lucentio is your name. Of whence, I pray?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Of Pisa, sir, son to Vincentio.
  • BAPTISTA
  • A mighty man of Pisa. By report I know him well.
  • A Servant enters.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Sirrah, lead these gentlemen to my daughters, and tell them both these re their tutors.
  • The Servant exits with Hortensio and Lucentio.
  • BAPTISTA
  • We will go walk a little in the orchard, and then to dinner.
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to Baptista, No. 2
  •  
  • You knew my father well, and through him me,
  • Sole heir to all his lands and goods, which we
  • Have bettered rather than decreased. If I
  • Win your daughter’s love, and with her as wife
  • Have a generous dowry, then my
  • Promise to her is widow’s rights for life,
  • Should she survive me, in whatsoever
  • Is mine. That we have records on either
  • Hand, let special contracts be drawn between
  • Us. Where two furious fires meet by fate,
  • They do consume all matter that doth seem
  • To feed their fury; though small fires grow great,
  • Extreme gusts will blow out what fire there be.
  • So I will yield to her and she to me.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Well mayst thou woo, and happy be thy speed. But be thou armed for some unhappy words.
  • Hortensio as Litio enters with his head broken.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Will my daughter prove a good musician?
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • I think she’ll sooner prove a soldier! Iron may hold with her, but never lutes.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Why, then thou canst not train her to play the lute?
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • I did but tell her she misplaced her fingers, and with that she struck me on the head. She did call me “rascal fiddler,” and “twangling Jack.”
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Now, by the world, it is a lusty wench. I love her ten times more than e’er I did.
  • BAPTISTA TO HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • Proceed in practice with my younger daughter. She’s apt to learn, and thankful for good turns. Signior Petruchio, will you go with us, or shall I send my daughter Kate to you?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I pray you do. I’ll attend her here.
  • All but Petruchio exit.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • And woo her with some spirit when she comes!
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to himself, and later Katherine
  •  
  • Say that if when she arrives she doth rail,
  • Why I’ll say she sings as a nightingale.
  • Say that she frowns, I’ll say she looks as clear
  • As morning roses newly washed with due.
  • Say she stands utterly mute, I’ll say, dear,
  • Your generous eloquence becomes you.
  • Say she bids I pack up and leave, I’ll say
  • Thanks, as if she asked me to stay all day.
  • Here she comes. O Kate, it’s time to begin
  • A romance. Bonny Kate, and sometimes Kate
  • The curst, but Kate, the prettiest Kate in
  • Christendom, a most precious, future mate.
  • Kate: hearing thy mildness much of my life,
  • Myself am moved to woo thee for my wife.
  • KATHERINE
  • Well have you heard, but something hard of hearing. They call me Katherine that do talk of me. Let him that moved you hither remove you hence.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Come, you wasp! I’ faith, you are too angry.
  • KATHERINE
  • If I be waspish, best beware my sting.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Nay, good Kate. I am a gentleman.
  • She strikes him.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I swear I’ll cuff you if you strike gain.
  • KATHERINE
  • If you strike me, you are no gentleman.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Nay, come, Kate, come. You must not look so sour.
  • KATHERINE
  • It is my fashion when I see a crab. Let me go.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Setting all this chat aside, thus in plain terms: your father hath consented that you shall be my wife, your dowry ‘greed on, and, whether you like it or not, I will marry you.
  • Baptista, Gremio, and Tranio as Lucentio enter.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Now, Signior Petruchio, how speed you with my daughter?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • How but well, sir?
  • BAPTISTA
  • Why, how now, daughter Katherine?
  • KATHERINE
  • Call you me daughter? Now I promise you you have showed a tender fatherly regard, to wish me wed to one half lunatic.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • We have ‘greed so well together that upon Sunday is the wedding day.
  • KATHERINE
  • I’ll see thee hanged on Sunday first.
  • GREMIO
  • Hark, Petruchio, she says she’ll see thee hanged first.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Is this your success?
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to Baptista, Gremio and Tranio
  •  
  • Be patient, gentlemen. What’s it to you
  • If we be pleased? We’ve agreed ‘twixt us two
  • That she shall still be curst in company.
  • But when we two alone! She’s the kindest
  • Kate! You’ll ne’er believe how much she loves me.
  • Hear me: she hung about my neck and kissed
  • And kissed, repeatedly, protesting oath
  • On oath, capturing my heart, as we both
  • Yielded to our love. ‘Tis a world to see
  • When she and I are alone, how a tame
  • And meek wretch can make the curstest shrew. We
  • Shall buy a gown that will enrich your fame,
  • While you, father, rejoice, and bid each guest.
  • I’ll assure my Katherine looks her best.
  • BAPTISTA
  • I know not what to say, but give me your hands. ‘Tis a match.
  • GREMIO AND TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Amen, say we.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Father, and wife, and gentlemen, adieu. I will to Venice. We will have rings, and things, and fine array, and kiss me, Kate. We will be married o’ Sunday.
  • Petruchio and Katherine exit through separate doors.
  • GREMIO
  • Was ever match arranged up so suddenly?
  • BAPTISTA
  • The gain I seek, is quiet in the match.
  • GREMIO
  • But now, Baptista, to your younger daughter. Now is the day we long have looked for. I am your neighbor and was suitor first.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • And I am one that love Bianca more than words can witness or your thoughts can guess.
  • GREMIO
  • Youngling, thou canst not love so dear as I.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Graybeard, thy love doth freeze.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Content you, gentlemen. ‘Tis deeds must win the prize, and he of both that can assure my daughter greatest dower shall have my Bianca’s love.
  • GREMIO
  • First, as you know, my house within the city is richly furnished with plate and gold. Myself am struck in years, I must confess, and if I die tomorrow this is hers, if whilst I live she will be only mine.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Sir, I am my father’s heir and only son. If I may have your daughter to my wife, I’ll leave her houses three or four as good, besides two thousand ducats by the year of fruitful land, all which shall be her estate, which she will inherit at my death.
  • GREMIO
  • Two thousand ducats by the year of land?
  • GREMIO ASIDE
  • My land amounts not to so much in all.
  • GREMIO
  • Nay, I have offered all. I have no more, and she can have no more than all I have.
  • GREMIO TO BAPTISTA
  • If you like me, she shall have me and mine.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Why, then, the maid is mine from all the world, by your firm promise. Gremio is outbid.
  • BAPTISTA
  • I must confess your offer is the best, and let your father make her the assurance, she is your own; else, you must pardon me. If you should die before him, where’s her dower.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • That’s but a meaningless objection. He is old, I young.
  • GREMIO
  • And may not young men die as well as old?
  • BAPTISTA
  • Well, gentlemen, I am resolved: on Sunday next, you know my daughter Katherine is to be married.
  • BAPTISTA TO TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Now, on the Sunday following, shall Bianca be bride to you, if you make this assurance. If not, to Signior Gremio. And so I take my leave, and thank you both.
  • Baptista exits.
  • GREMIO
  • Now I fear thee not. Sirrah young gambler, your father were a fool to give thee all and in his waning age be reduced to a guest in your house. An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.
  • Gremio exits.
  • TRANIO
  • A vengeance on your crafty withered hide! I see no reason but supposed Lucentio must beget a father, called “supposed Vincentio.” But in this case of wooing, a child shall get a father.
  • He exits.
  • Act 3, Scene 1
  • Lucentio as Cambio, Hortensio as Litio, and Bianca enter.
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO
  • Fiddler, forbear. You grow too forward, sir.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • But, wrangling pedant, Bianca is the patroness of heavenly harmony. Give me permission to go first, and when in music we have spent an hour, your lecture shall have equal time.
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO
  • Preposterous fool, music is to follow work, not precede it.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • Sirrah, I will not endure these taunts.
  • BIANCA
  • Why, gentlemen, I am no scholar in the schools. I’ll learn my lessons as I please myself. And, to cut off all strife, here sit we down.
  • BIANCA TO HORTENSIO
  • Take you your instrument, play you the whiles; his lecture will be done ere you have tuned.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • You’ll leave his lecture when I am in tune?
  • LUCENTIO ASIDE
  • That will be never.
  • LUCENTIO TO HORTENSIO
  • Tune your instrument.
  • Lucentio as Cambio tutors Bianca.
  • BIANCA
  • Interpret them.
  • LUCENTIO
  • As I told you before, I am Lucentio, son unto Vincentio of Pisa, disguised thus to get your love, and that “Lucentio” that comes a-wooing, is my man Tranio, assuming my social position, that we might beguile Gremio.
  • BIANCA
  • Now let me see if I can interpret it. I trust you not; take heed he hear us not; presume not, despair not.
  • HORENTSIO AS LITIO
  • Madam, ‘tis not in tune.
  • Hortensio plays the lute.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • Madam, ‘tis now in tune.
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO
  • All but the base.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • The bass is right. ‘Tis the base knave that jars.
  • HORTENSIO ASIDE
  • How fiery and forward our pedant is. Now for my life the knave doth court my love!
  • BIANCA TO LUCENTIO
  • In time I may believe, yet I mistrust. But let it rest. Now, Litio, to you.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO TO LUCENTIO
  • You may go walk, and give me leave awhile.
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO
  • Are you so formal, sir?
  • LUCENTIO ASIDE
  • I must wait aside and watch withal, for, but I be deceived, our fine musician groweth amorous.
  • He steps aside.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • Madam, before you touch the instrument, I must teach you scales in a more pleasant sort than hath been taught by any of my trade.
  • BIANCA
  • Why, I am past my scales long ago.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Yet read the scales of Hortensio.
  • He gives her a paper.
  • BIANCA
  • Tut, I like it not. Old fashions please me best. I am not so nice to change true rules for odd inventions.
  • A Servant enters.
  • SERVANT
  • Mistress, your father prays you leave your books and help to dress your sister’s chamber up. You know tomorrow is the wedding day.
  • BIANCA
  • Farewell, sweet masters both. I must be gone.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Faith, mistress, then I have no cause to stay.
  • Bianca, the Servant, and Lucentio exit.
  • HORTENSIO
  • But I have cause to pry into this pedant. Methinks he looks as though he were in love.
  • He exits.
  • Act 3, Scene 2
  • Baptista, Gremio, Tranio as Lucentio, Katherine, Bianca, Lucentio as Cambio, as well as others enter.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Signior Lucentio, this is the ‘pointed day that Katherine and Petruchio should be married, and yet we hear not of our son-in-law. What will be said?
  • KATHERINE
  • No shame of mine. I must, forsooth, be forced to give my hand, opposed against my heart, unto a mad-brain fellow, who wooed in haste and means to wed at leisure.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Patience, good Katherine, and Baptista too. Upon my life, Petruchio means but well.
  • KATHERINE
  • Would Katherine had never seen him!
  • She exits weeping.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Go, girl. I cannot blame thee now to weep.
  • Biondello enters.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Is he come? When will he be here?
  • BIONDELLO
  • When he stands where I am, and sees you there.
  •  
  •  
  • Biondello to Baptista and Tranio
  •  
  • Petruchio is coming in a bold
  • Hat and an odd jacket, a pair of old
  • Breeches turned inside out, a pair of boots,
  • One buckled and one laced; an old rusty
  • Sword, unsheathed and badly broken, that suits
  • A fool, taken from the town armory.
  • His sick horse, disfigured by jaundice, begs
  • Aid, having ugly tumors on his legs,
  • Ulcerated and ruined by inflamed
  • Cartilage, wears an old mothy saddle
  • With two faulty unmatched stirrups, restrained
  • From stumbling by a sheep’s leather bridle,
  • Often burst and repaired with knots, is led
  • With a strap of velour pieced with packthread.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Who comes with him?
  • BIONDELLO
  • Oh, sir, his lackey, with a linen stock on one leg and a wool stocking on the other, gartered with a red and blue cloth border.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • ‘Tis some odd humor pricks him to this fashion.
  • BAPTISTA
  • I am glad he’s come, howsoe’er he comes.
  • BIONDELLO
  • Why, sir, he comes not.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Didst thou not say he comes?
  • BIONDELLO
  • No, sir, I say his horse comes with him on his back.
  • Petruchio and Grumio enter.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Who’s at home?
  • BAPTISTA
  • You are welcome, sir.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Not so well appareled as I wish you were.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • But where is Kate? Where is my lovely bride? How does my father? Gentles, methinks you frown. And wherefore gaze this goodly company as if they saw some comet.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Why, sir, you know this is your wedding day. First were we sad, fearing you would not come, now sadder that you come so unprovided.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Sufficeth I am come to keep my word. But where is Kate? ‘Tis time we were at church.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • See not your bride in these unreverent robes. Go to my chamber, put on clothes of mine.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Not I, believe me. To me she’s married, not unto my clothes. But what a fool am I to chat with you when I should bid good morrow to my bride and seal the title with a lovely kiss!
  • Petruchio and Grumio exit.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • He hath some meaning in his mad attire. We will persuade him, be it possible, to put on better ere he go to church.
  • All exit except Tranio.
  • TRANIO
  • I am to get a man, whate’er he be, and he shall be “Vincentio of Pisa,” and make assurance here in Padua of greater sums than I have promised. We’ll overreach the graybeard, Gremio, the narrow prying father, Minola, the quaint musician, amorous Litio, all for my master’s sake, Lucentio.
  • Gremio enters.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Is the bride and bridegroom coming home?
  • GREMIO
  • A bridegroom, say you? ‘Tis a groom indeed, a grumbling groom.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Why, she’s a devil, a devil, the devil’s dam.
  • GREMIO
  • Tut, she’s a lamb, a dove, a fool to him.
  •  
  •  
  • Gremio to Tranio as Lucentio
  •  
  • I’ll tell you, Lucentio, when the priest
  • Did ask if she should be his wife, he ceased
  • Civility and swore so loud that the
  • Priest let fall the book, and when he stooped to
  • Pick it up he hit the priest with such a
  • Cuff that down fell the priest and book. Would you
  • Believe? He stamped and swore as the vicar
  • Finished the service. Then he cried, “Where are
  • The muscatels.” He went on to beck
  • More wine and continued with his drinking.
  • This done, he took the bride about the neck
  • And kissed her lips with a most clamoring
  • Smack. Having ne’er heard the church echo more,
  • I knew such a marriage ne’er was before.
  • GREMIO
  • Hark, hark, I hear the minstrels play.
  • Petruchio, Katherine, Bianca, Hortensio, Baptista, Grumio and others enter.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Gentlemen and friends. I thank you for your pains. My haste doth call me hence, and therefore here I mean to take my leave.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Is ‘t possible you will away tonight?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I must away today, before night come. If you knew my business, you would entreat me rather go than stay. I thank you all, that have beheld me give away myself to this most patient, sweet, and virtuous wife.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Let us entreat you stay till after dinner.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • It may not be.
  • KATHERINE
  • Let me entreat you. If you love me, stay.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Grumio, my horse. O Kate, content thee. Prithee, be not angry.
  • KATHERINE
  • I will be angry. What hast thou to do? Father, be quiet. He shall wait till I am ready. Gentlemen, forward to the bridal dinner. I see a woman may be made a fool if she had not a spirit to resist.
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to the wedding party
  •  
  • They shall go forward, Kate, as thy suggest.
  • Obey the bride, you and you and the rest
  • That attend to her. Go feast and carouse,
  • Revel, be mad and merry, honor her.
  • But for my bonny Kate, marriage allows
  • Her to be with me; I will be master
  • Of what is mine own. She is mine own goods,
  • My house, my horse, my field, my barn, my woods,
  • My anything. Touch her whoever dare,
  • For if you may, I’ll bring legal action
  • On the proudest he, if he doth so care
  • To stop me. Sirrah, rescue this woman.
  • Fear not, they will not touch thee, fairest one.
  • I’ll defend thee, Kate, against a million.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Fear not, sweet wench, they shall not touch thee, Kate.
  • Petruchio, Katherine and Grumio exit.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Nay, let them go. A couple of quiet ones!
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Of all mad matches never was the like.
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO TO BIANCA
  • Mistress, what’s your opinion of your sister?
  • BIANCA
  • That being mad herself, she’s madly mated.
  • GREMIO
  • I warrant him, Petruchio is Kated.
  • They exit.
  • Act 4, Scene 1
  • Grumio is on stage, at Petruchio’s house in the country.
  • GRUMIO
  • Was ever man so beaten? Was ever man so betrayed? Was ever man so weary? I am sent before to make a fire, and they are coming after to warm them. Hello, Curtis!
  • Curtis enters.
  • CURTIS
  • Who is that calls so coldly.
  • GRUMIO
  • A fire, good Curtis!
  • CURTIS
  • There’s fire ready. And therefore, good Grumio, the news!
  • GRUMIO
  • First, know my horse is tired, my master and mistress fallen out.
  • CURTIS
  • How?
  • GRUMIO
  • Out of their saddles into the dirt, and thereby hangs a tale.
  • CURTIS
  • Let’s ha’t, good Grumio.
  • GRUMIO
  • Now I begin: we came down a foul hill, my master riding behind my mistress. Her horse fell, and she under her horse; thou shouldst have heard in how swampy a place; how he beat me because her horse stumbled, how she waded through the dirt to pluck him off me, how the horses ran away.
  • CURTIS
  • He is more shrew than she.
  • GRUMIO
  • But what talk I of this? Call forth Nathaniel, Joseph, Nicholas, Phillip, Walter and the rest. Are they ready?
  • CURTIS
  • They are.
  • GRUMIO
  • Call them forth.
  • Curtis calls them out. Four or five Servingmen enter. Petruchio and Katherine enter.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Where be these knaves?
  • SERVINGMEN
  • Here, sir, here, sir!
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Where is the foolish knave I sent before?
  • GRUMIO
  • Here, sir, as foolish as I was before.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • You country bumpkin. Did I bid thee bring along these rascal knaves with thee?
  • GRUMIO
  • As they are, here are they come to meet you.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Go, rascals, go and fetch my supper in!
  • The Servants exit.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Good sweet Kate, be merry. Off with my boots, you rogues.
  • A servant begins to remove Petruchio’s boots.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Where are my slippers? Shall I have some water?
  • He hits the Servant.
  • KATHERINE
  • Patience, I pray you, ‘twas a fault unwilling.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Come, Kate, sit down. Will you give thanks, sweet Kate, or else shall I? What’s this? Mutton?
  • FIRST SERVANT
  • Ay.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Who brought it?
  • PETER
  • I.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • ‘Tis burnt, and so is all the meat. How durst you, villains, serve it thus to me that love it not?
  • He throws the food and dishes at them. The Servants exit.
  • KATHERINE
  • I pray you, husband, be not so disquiet. The meat was well, if you were so contented.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I tell thee, Kate, ‘twas burnt and dried away, and I expressly am forbid to touch it, for it engenders choler. Be patient. Tomorrow ‘t shall be mended. Come, I will baring thee to thy bridal chamber.
  • They exit. The Servants exit separately.
  • GRUMIO
  • Where is he?
  • CURTIS
  • In her chamber, railing that she knows not which way to stand, to look, to speak. Away, for he is coming hither!
  • They exit. Petruchio enters.
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to the Audience
  •  
  • My falcon now is hungry but never
  • Looks for bait, except to me. She knows her
  • Keeper’s call. She ate no meat today nor
  • None shall she. She’ll sleep not this night after
  • None last night, some undeserved fault found or
  • Other measure taken to deny her
  • Sleep and meat. Amid this agitation
  • I intend all to be done kindly in
  • Reverend care of her, not to disturb
  • Her as she’s kept awake all night and frets
  • With my railing and brawling; thus I’ll curb
  • Her mad and headstrong humor. You who lets
  • Me know a better way to tame a shrew
  • Will find me forever grateful to you.
  • He exits.
  • Act 4, Scene 2
  • Tranio as Lucentio and Hortensio as Litio are talking in Baptista’s house.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Is ‘t possible, friend Litio, that mistress Bianca doth fancy any other but Lucentio?
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • Sir, stand by, and mark the manner of his teaching.
  • They stand aside. Bianca and Lucentio as Cambio enter.
  • BIANCA
  • What, master, read you?
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO
  • I read that I profess. The Art to Love.
  • BIANCA
  • And may you prove, sir, master of your art.
  • LUCENTIO AS CAMBIO
  • While you, sweet dear, prove mistress of my heart.
  • They move aside, kiss and talk.
  • HORTENSIO AS LITIO
  • Now tell me, I pray, you that durst swear that your mistress Bianca loved none in the world so well as Lucentio.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • O despiteful love, unconstant womankind! I tell thee, Litio, this is wonderful.
  •  
  •  
  • Hortensio to Tranio as Lucentio
  •  
  • Make no mistake my friend, I am neither
  • Litio nor the musician I here
  • Seem to be, but one who scorns Cambio,
  • Living in this disguise, making a god
  • Of such a dullard. I’m Hortensio.
  • See how they do kiss. See how beastly odd
  • She doth court him! I firmly vow never
  • To woo her again, and do forswear her
  • As one unworthy of all the former
  • Favors I’ve fondly flattered her withal.
  • I’ll be married to a widow before
  • Three days pass, who hath loved me from my call
  • Long ago. The kindness of a woman,
  • Not her looks, shall win the love of this man.
  • HORTENSIO
  • So I take my leave, in resolution as I swore before.
  • Hortensio exits. Bianca and Lucentio come forward.
  • TRANIO
  • Mistress Bianca, bless you with such grace as belongeth to a lover’s blessed case! I have forsworn you with Hortensio.
  • BIANCA
  • Tranio, you jest. But have you both forsworn me?
  • TRANIO
  • Mistress, we have.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Then we are rid of Litio
  • TRANIO
  • I’ faith, he’ll have a lusty widow now that shall be wooed and wedded in a day.
  • BIANCA
  • God give him joy.
  • TRANIO
  • Ay, and he’ll tame her. He is gone unto the taming school.
  • BIANCA
  • The taming school? What, is there such a place?
  • TRANIO
  • Ay, mistress, and Petruchio is the master, that teacheth tricks to tame a shrew and charm her chattering tongue.
  • Biondello enters.
  • BIONELLO
  • O master, I spied a reliable old man coming down the hill will suit the purpose.
  • TRANIO
  • What is he, Biondello?
  • BIONDELLO
  • Master, a merchant, I know not what, but formal in apparel, in gait surely like a father.
  • LUCENTIO
  • And what of him, Tranio?
  • TRANIO
  • If he trust my tale, I’ll make him glad to seem Vincentio and give assurance to Baptista Minola as if he were the right Vincentio.
  • Lucentio and Bianca exit. The Merchant enters.
  • MERCHANT
  • God save you, sir.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • You are welcome. Travel you far on, or are you at the farthest?
  • MERCHANT
  • Sir, at the farthest for a week or two.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • What countryman, I pray?
  • MERCHANT
  • Of Mantua.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Of Mantua, sir? God forbid! And come to Padua, careless of your life?
  • MERCHANT
  • My life, sir? How, I pray?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • ‘Tis death for anyone in Mantua to come to Padua.
  • MERCHANT
  • Alas, sir, I have bills for money by exchange from Florence, and must here deliver them.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Well, sir, to do you courtesy, I will advise you. Have you ever been at Pisa?
  • MERCHANT
  • Ay, sir, in Pisa have I often been.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Know you one Vincentio?
  • MERCHANT
  • I know him not, but I have heard of him: a merchant of incomparable wealth.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • he is my father, sir, and in count’nance somewhat doth resemble you.
  • BIONDELLO ASIDE
  • As much as an apple doth an oyster.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • To save your life in this extremity, his name and credit shall you undertake, and in my house you shall be friendly lodged. You understand me, sir. So shall you stay till you have done your business in the city. If this be court’sy, sir, accept of it.
  • MERCHANT
  • O sir, I do.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • This I let you understand: my father is here looked for every day to pass assurance of a dower in marriage ‘twixt me and one Baptista’s daughter here. In all these circumstances I’ll instruct you.
  • They exit.
  • Act 4, Scene 3
  • Katherine and Grumio enter at Petruchio’s home.
  • KATHERINE
  • What, did he marry me to famish me? I am starved for met, giddy for lack of sleep, with oaths kept waking and with brawling fed. He does it under name of perfect love. I prithee, go, and get me some repast, I care not what, so it be wholesome food.
  • GRUMIO
  • How say you to a fat tripe finely broiled?
  • KATHERINE
  • Good Grumio, fetch it me.
  • GRUMIO
  • I cannot tell. I fear ‘tis choleric. What say you to a piece of beef and mustard?
  • KATHERINE
  • A dish that I do love to feed upon.
  • GRUMIO
  • Ay, but the mustard is too hot a little.
  • KATHERINE
  • Why then, the beef, and let the mustard rest.
  • GRUMIO
  • Nay then, I will not. You shall have the mustard or else you get no beef of Grumio.
  • KATHERINE
  • Then both, or one, or any thing thou wilt.
  • GRUMIO
  • Why, then, the mustard without the beef.
  • KATHERINE
  • Go, get thee gone.
  • She beats him. Petruchio and Hortensio enter.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • How fares my Kate?
  • KATHERINE
  • Faith, as cold as can be.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Pluck up thy spirits. Seest how diligent I am, to dress thy meat myself and bring it thee. What, not a word? Here, take away this dish.
  • KATHERINE
  • I pray you, let it stand.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • The poorest service is repaid with thanks, and so shall mine before you touch the meat.
  • KATHERINE
  • I thank you, sir.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Come, Mistress Kate, I’ll bear you company.
  • PETRUCHIO ASIDE TO HORTENSIO
  • Eat it up all, Hortensio, if thou lovest me.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Kate, eat apace.
  • Katherine and Hortensio prepare to eat.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • And now, my honey love, will we return unto thy father’s house with silken coats and caps and golden rings. The tailor stays thy leisure to deck thy body with his ruffling treasure.
  • A Tailor and Haberdasher enter.
  • HABERDASHER
  • Here is the cap your Worship did bespeak.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Why, ‘tis a walnut shell. Away with it. Come, let me have a bigger.
  • KATHERINE
  • I’ll have no bigger.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • When you are gentle, you shall have one too, and not till then.
  • KATHERINE
  • Why, sir, I am no child, no babe. My tongue will tell the anger of my heart.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • It is a paltry cap, a bauble, a crust for a custard.
  • KATHERINE
  • I like the cap, and it I will have, or I will have none.
  • The Haberdasher exits, with the cap.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Thy gown? Let us see ‘t. O mercy God, what costumes for maskers is here? Why, what a devil’s name, tailor, call’st thou this?
  • TAILOR
  • You bid me make it orderly and well.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I did not bid you mar it to the time. I’ll none of it.
  • KATHERINE
  • I never saw a better-fashioned gown, more quaint, more pleasing, nor more commendable.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Why, true, he means to make a puppet of thee.
  • TAILOR
  • She says your Worship means to make a puppet of her.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • O monstrous arrogance! Thou liest, thou thread, thou thimble, thou yard! Away, you rag. I tell thee, I, that thou hast marred her gown.
  • TAILOR
  • The gown is made just as my master had direction. Grumio gave order how it should be done.
  • GRUMIO
  • I gave him no order. I gave him the stuff.
  • TAILOR
  • But did you not request to have it cut?
  • GRUMIO
  • I bid thy master cut out the gown, but I did not bid him cut it to pieces.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Well, sir, in brief, the gown is not for me.
  • GRUMIO
  • You are i’ th’ right, sir, ‘tis for my mistress.
  • PETRUCHIO ASIDE TO HORTENSIIO
  • Hortensio, say thou wilt see the tailor paid.
  • PETRUCHIO TO THE TAILOR
  • Go, take it hence. Be gone, and say no more.
  • HORTENSIO TO THE TAILOR
  • Tailor, I’ll pay thee for the gown tomorrow.
  • Tailor exits.
  •  
  •  
  • Petruchio to Katherine
  •  
  • Come, my Kate. In our most modest clothes we
  • Will to your father’s. Our purses shall be
  • Proud, our garments poor, for it is the mind
  • That makes the body rich. And as the sun
  • Breaks through the darkest clouds, honor doth find
  • Its way to peereth through the most common
  • Ware. Is the jay more precious than the lark
  • Because the songbird’s feathers are more stark?
  • Is the snake better than the eel because
  • His painted skin contents the eye? Oh no.
  • Wearing ordinary apparel does
  • Not make you worse, but if thou art shamed, owe
  • It to me. I’ll plan to frolic and to
  • Enjoy life at thy father’s house with you.
  • PETRUCHIO TO GRUMIO
  • Go, call my men, and let us straight to him. Well we may come there by dinner time.
  • KATHERINE
  • I dare assure you, sir, ‘tis almost two, and ‘twill be supper time ere you come there.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I will not go today, and, ere I do, it shall be what o’clock I say it is.
  • HORTENSIO ASIDE
  • Why, so, this gallant will command the sun!
  • They exit.
  • Act 4, Scene 4
  • In Padua, Tranio and the Merchant, dressed as Vincentio, enter.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Sir, this is the house.
  • MERCHANT
  • Ay, but I be deceived, signior Baptista may remember me, near twenty years ago, in Genoa, we were lodgers at the Pegasus.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Hold your own in any case.
  • MERCHANT
  • I warrant you.
  • Biondello enters.
  • TANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Hast thou done thy errand to Baptista?
  • BIONDELLO
  • I told him that your father was at Venice, and that you looked for him this day in Padua.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Thou art a fine fellow.
  • He gives him money. Baptista and Lucentio as Cambio enter.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Signior Baptista, this is the gentleman I told you of.
  • MERCHANT AS VINCENTIO
  • Soft, son.
  •  
  •  
  • Merchant as Vincentio to Baptista
  •  
  • Sir, while on business in Padua, where
  • My son Lucentio made me aware
  • Of a weighty cause of love between your
  • Daughter and himself, and for the consent
  • He seeks from us, and the love he hath for
  • Her, and she for him, I am most content
  • With the care a father should have to see
  • Them soon matched, since both dissemble deeply
  • Their affections to each other. If you
  • Like this pairing no worse than I, then the
  • Bestowal agreement shall be. Not too
  • Much from you dare I demand, Baptista.
  • She loveth him, your beautiful daughter,
  • And my son doth right truly loveth her.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Sir, pardon me in what I have to say, your plainness and your shortness please me well. Therefore, if you will pass my daughter a sufficient dower, the match is made, and all is done.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Where then do you know best we be formally betrothed?
  • BAPTISTA
  • Not in my house, Lucentio, for you know we might be overheard, and I have many servants.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Then at my lodging. There doth my father lie, and there this night we’ll pass the business privately and well.
  • He looks at Lucentio and winks.
  • BAPTISTA
  • It pleases me well. Cambio, hie you home, and bid Bianca make her ready straight. And tell what hath happened: Lucentio’s father is arrived in Padua, and how she’s like to be Lucentio’s wife.
  • Lucentio exits.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Signior Baptista, shall I lead the way?
  • BAPTISTA
  • I follow you.
  • All but Biondello exit. Lucentio enters.
  • BIONDELLO
  • You saw my master wink and laugh upon you.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Biondello, what of that?
  • BIONDELLO
  • Faith, nothing. Baptista is safe, talking with the deceiving father of a deceitful son.
  • LUCENTIO
  • And what of him?
  • BIONDELLO
  • His daughter is to be brought by you to the supper.
  • LUCENTIO
  • And then?
  • BIONDELLO
  • The old priest at Saint Luke’s Church is at your command at all hours.
  • LUCENTIO
  • And what of all this?
  • BIONDELLO
  • I cannot tell, except they are busied about a counterfeit assurance. If this be not what you look for, I have no more to say, but bid Bianca farewell forever and a day.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Hear’st thou, Biondello.
  • BIONDELLO
  • I cannot tarry. My master hath appointed me to go the Saint Luke’s to bid the priest be ready.
  • He exits.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Whatever may happen may. I’ll approach her boldly. It shall go hard if “Cambio” go without her.
  • He exits.
  • Act 4, Scene 5
  • Katherine, Petruchio and Hortensio are on their way to her father’s house.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Come on, i’ God’s name, once more toward Baptista’s. How bright and goodly shines the moon!
  • KATHERINE
  • It is not moonlight now.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I say it is the moon that shines so bright.
  • KATHERINE
  • I know it is the sun that shines so bright.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Now, by my mother’s son, and that’s myself, it shall be moon, or star, or what I please.
  • HORTENSIO TO KATHERINE
  • Say as he says, or we shall never go.
  • KATHERINE
  • Forward, I pray, since we have come so far. If you please to call it a cheap candle, henceforth I vow it shall be so for me.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I say it is the moon.
  • KATHERINE
  • I know it is the moon.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Nay, then you lie. It is the blessed sun.
  • KATHERINE
  • Then God be blest, it is the blessed sun.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • But wait a minute! Company is coming here.
  • Vincentio enters.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Good old grandsire, make known which way thou travelest. If along with us, we shall be joyful of thy company.
  • VINCENTIO
  • My name is called Vincentio, my dwelling Pisa, and bound I am to Padua, there to visit a son of mine which long I have not seen.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • What is his name?
  • VINCENTIO
  • Lucentio, gentle sir.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Happily met, the happier for thy son. I may entitle thee my loving father. The sister to my wife, this gentlewoman, thy son by this hath married. Wonder not, nor be not grieved. She is of good esteem, her dowry wealthy, and of worthy birth.
  • VINCENTIO
  • But is this true, or is it else your pleasure, like pleasant travelers, to break a jest upon the company you overtake.
  • HORTENSIO
  • I do assure thee, father, so it is.
  • All but Hortensio exit.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Well, Petruchio, this has put me in heart! Now for my widow.
  • He exits.
  • Act 5, Scene 1
  • Lucentio as himself, Bianca and Biondello enter the stage. Gremio follows them but stands aside.
  • BIONDELLO
  • Softly and swiftly, sir, for the priest is ready.
  • LUCENTIO
  • I fly, Biondello.
  • Lucentio and Bianca exit. Petruchio, Katherine, Vincentio and Grumio enter.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • This is Lucentio’s house. Here I leave you, sir.
  • VINCENTIO
  • You shall not choose but drink before you go. Refreshment can be expected.
  • He knocks.
  • MERCHANT AS VINCENTIO
  • What’s he that knocks as he would beat down the gate?
  • VINCENTIO
  • Is Signior Lucentio within, sir?
  • MERCHANT AS VINCENTIO
  • He’s within, sir, but not to be spoken with.
  • PETRUCHIO TO VINCENTIO
  • I pray you tell Signior Lucentio that his father is come from Pisa.
  • MERCHANT AS VINCENTIO
  • Thou liest. His father is here looking out at the window.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Art thou his father?
  • MERCHANT AS VINCENTIO
  • Ay, sir, so his mother says.
  • PETRUCHIO TO VINCENTIO
  • Why, this is flat knavery, to take upon you another man’s name.
  • MERCHANT AS VINCENTIO
  • Lay hands on the villain.
  • Biondello enters.
  • BIONDELLO ASIDE
  • But who is here? Mine old master Vincentio! Now we are undone and brought to nothing.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Come hither, you rogue! What, have you forgot me?
  • BIONDELLO
  • Forgot you? No, sir. I could not forget you, for I never saw you before in all my life.
  • Vincentio beats Biondello. Biondello exits.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Prithee, Kate, let’s stand aside and see the end of this controversy.
  • They move aside. The Merchant, Baptista and Tranio as Lucentio enter.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Sir, what are you that offer to beat my servant?
  • VINCENTIO
  • What am I, sir. What are you, sir! O finely dressed rogue! A silken jacket! O, I am undone. While I play the good husband at home, my son and my servant spend all at the university.
  • BAPTISTA
  • What, is the man lunatic?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Your words show you a madman. Why, sir, what concerns it you if I wear pearl and gold? I thank my good father, I am able to maintain it.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Thy father! He is a sail maker in Bergamo.
  • BAPTISTA
  • You mistake, sir! Pray, what do you think is his name?
  • VINCENTIO
  • His name? I have brought him up ever since he was three years old, and his name is Tranio.
  • MERCHANT AS VINCENTIO
  • His name is Lucentio and he is mine only son.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Lucentio? O, he hath murdered his master! Tell me, thou villain, where is my son Lucentio?
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Call forth an officer.
  • An Officer enters.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Carry this mad knave to the jail.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Carry me to the jail?
  • GREMIO
  • Stay, officer. He shall not go to prison.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Talk not, Signior Gremio. I say he shall go to prison.
  • GREMIO
  • Take heed, Signior Baptista. I dare swear this is the right Vincentio.
  • TRANIO AS LUCENTIO
  • Then thou wert best say that I am not Lucentio.
  • GREMIO
  • Yes, I know thee to be Signior Lucentio.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Away with the foolish old man, to the jail with him.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Thus strangers may be abused. O monstrous villain!
  • Biondello, Lucentio and Bianca enter.
  • BIONDELLO
  • O, we are ruined, and yonder he is! Deny him, forswear him, or else we are all undone.
  • Biondello, Tranio and the Merchant exit quickly.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Pardon, sweet father.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Lives my sweet son?
  • BAPTISTA
  • Where is Lucentio?
  • LUCENTIO
  • Here’s Lucentio, right son to the right Vincentio, that have by marriage made thy daughter mine while false impersonations bleared thine eyes.
  • VINCENTIO
  • Where is that villain, Tranio, that faced and braved me in this matter so?
  • BAPTISTA
  • Why, is not this my Cambio?
  • BIANCA
  • Cambio is changed into Lucentio.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Love wrought these miracles. What Tranio did, myself enforced him to. Pardon him, sweet father, for my sake.
  • VINCENTIO
  • I’ll slit the villain’s nose that would have sent me to the jail!
  • BAPTISTA
  • Sir, have you married my daughter without asking my goodwill?
  • VINCENTIO
  • Fear not, Baptista, we will content you. But I will be revenged for this villainy.
  • He exits.
  • BAPTISTA
  • And I to sound the depth of this knavery.
  • He exits.
  • LUCENTIO
  • Look not pale, Bianca. Thy father will not frown.
  • They exit.
  • GREMIO
  • I’m without hope of anything except a share of the feast.
  • He exits.
  • KATHERINE
  • Husband, let’s follow.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • First kiss me, Kate, and we will
  • KATHERINE
  • What, in the midst of the street?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • What, art thou ashamed of me?
  • KATHERINE
  • No, sir, God forbid, but ashamed to kiss.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Why, then, let’s home again.
  • KATHERINE
  • Nay, I will give thee a kiss.
  • She kisses him.
  • KATHERINE
  • Now pray thee, love, stay.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Is not this well? Come, my sweet Kate.
  • They exit.
  • Act 5, Scene 2
  • Baptista, Vincentio, Gremio, the Merchant, Lucentio and Bianca, Hortensio and the Widow, Petruchio and Katherine, Tranio, Biondello and Grumio enter.
  • LUCENTIO
  • At long last, our jarring notes agree, and time to smile at escapes and perils past. My fair Bianca, bid my father welcome, while I with selfsame kindness welcome thine. Brother Petruchio, sister Katherina, and thou Hortensio, with thy loving widow, fest with the best, and welcome to my house.
  • Bianca, Katherine, and the Widow exit.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Now, in good sadness, son Petruchio, I think thou hast the most complete shrew of all.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Well, I say no. Let’s each one send unto his wife, and he whose wife is most obedient to come at first when he doth send for her shall win the wager which we will propose.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Content, what’s the wager?
  • LUCENTIO
  • A hundred crowns.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Content. Who shall begin?
  • LUCENTIO
  • That will I. Go, Biondello, bid your mistress come to me.
  • He exits. He re-enters.
  • LUCENTIO
  • How now, what news?
  • BIONDELLO
  • Sir, my mistress sends you word that she is busy, and she cannot come.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • “She’s busy, and she cannot come?” Is that an answer?
  • GREMIO
  • Ay, and a kind one, too.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • I hope better.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Sirrah Biondello, go and entreat my wife to come to me forthwith.
  • He exits. He re-enters.
  • HORTENSIO
  • Now, where’s my wife?
  • BIONDELLO
  • She says you have some goodly jest in hand. She will not come. She bids you come to her.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Worse and worse. She will not come! Sirrah Grumio, go to your mistress, say I command her come to me.
  • Grumio exits. Katherine enters.
  • BAPTISTA
  • By the state of holiness, here comes Katherina!
  • KATHERINE
  • What is your will, sir, that you send for me?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Where is your sister, and Hortensio’s wife?
  • KATHERINE
  • They sit conferring by the parlor fire.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Go fetch them hither.
  • Katherine exits.
  • BAPTISTA
  • Now fair befall thee, good Petruchio! The wager thou hast won, and I will add unto their losses twenty thousand crowns, another dowry to another daughter, for she is changed as she had never been.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Nay, I will show more sign of her obedience.
  • Katherine, Bianca and the Widow enter.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Katherine, that cap of yours becomes you not. Throw it underfoot.
  • She obeys.
  • WIDOW
  • Lord, let me never have a cause to sigh till I be brought to such a silly pass.
  • BIANCA
  • Fie, what a foolish duty call you this?
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Katherine, I charge thee tell these headstrong women what duty they do owe their lords and husbands.
  • WIDOW
  • Come, come, you’re mocking. We will have no telling.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Come on, I say, and first begin with her.
  •  
  •  
  • Katherine to the Widow, No. 1
  •  
  • Unknit that threatening unkind brow, and dart
  • Not scornful glances that wound, for he art
  • Thy lord, thy keeper. It blots thy beauty
  • As frosts do bite the spring meadows, and in
  • No sense suitable. A woman angry
  • Is like a troubled, ill-serving fountain
  • Bereft of beauty from which none so dry
  • Will deign to sip of it. Thy husband’s thy
  • Life, who commits to thy maintenance, that
  • Cares for thee, enduring painful labor
  • Whilst thou liest warm, secure and safe at
  • Home, whilst he from your hands craves no other
  • Tribute but love and obedience, yet
  • Too little payment for so great a debt.
  •  
  •  
  • Katherine to the Widow, No. 2
  •  
  • When a wife is sour, sullen and peevish,
  • And not accepting to his honest wish,
  • She is at risk as a rebel to stay
  • With her lord. I am ashamed that women
  • Are so simple to offer war when they
  • Should seek peace, or to find ways to sway men
  • When they should serve and love. Our bodies, soft
  • And smooth, unsuited to toil in an oft
  • Troubled world, hold soft qualities, and our
  • Hearts should agree with our external parts.
  • Our lances are straws, strong as a flower.
  • Subdue pride; to fight is futile. Peace starts
  • When you demand less than he. If he please,
  • Have hands ready, if they may do him ease.
  • PETRUCHIO
  • Why, there’s a tamed shrew! Come on, and kiss me, Kate.
  • They kiss. They exit.

Copyright © 2010 Simplified Shakespeare

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